6 Replies Latest reply on Feb 12, 2016 3:53 PM by V1N0

    Powering Edison using a 3S 11.1v LiPo or a 5v BEC connection

    V1N0

      Hello everyone!

      So for my project i am using a LiPo battery (3s 25c 11.1v), to power up 4 ESCs in parallel, each of those ESCs also has a BEC output of 5v. What are the best ways that i can utilize those resources to power an Arduino Edison breakout board?

       

      pic-a-4826209122.JPGT2200-3-25(1).jpgsku_11981_2.jpg

       

      Thank you!

        • 1. Re: Powering Edison using a 3S 11.1v LiPo or a 5v BEC connection
          DiegoV_Intel

          Hi V1N0,

           

          The barrel jack power input can be powered with a voltage range of 7V to 15V, so you could apply the 11.1V to this input. On the other hand, the Vin input header is connected internally to the same line of the barrel jack, so you could also apply the power there. Be careful and choose only one of those inputs, if you power the board through both power inputs at the same time you could damage the board.

           

          Regards,

          Diego

          1 of 1 people found this helpful
          • 2. Re: Powering Edison using a 3S 11.1v LiPo or a 5v BEC connection
            V1N0

            Hello Diego,

            Thank you for your swift response!

             

            I was considering doing it this way, however, the Intel® Edison Breakout Board Hardware Guide states that the input should not be more than one amp. The reason stated is that "This supply was designed for a 1 A continuous supply. Higher currents will generate more power losses and may thermally damage the switcher." The battery generates 55 amps (2.2A * 25C). Is there anything i can do about that?

            I also considered plugging the 5v supply into the 5v pin. However, i saw the statement "Supplying voltage via the 5V or 3.3V pins bypasses the regulator, and can damage your board. We don't advise it." on the Arduino website.


            Hence why i am not sure that either options are safe to do, at least directly. Is there any better way to do it? some kind of regulator? This is my first attempt of making something that didn't come out of the box pre-installed so any information would help as i know almost nothing about powering circuitry.

            • 3. Re: Powering Edison using a 3S 11.1v LiPo or a 5v BEC connection
              DiegoV_Intel

              Hi V1N0,

               

              I haven't used those kinds of batteries (the ones used by hobbyists in cars, helicopters, airplanes, etc.), but I don't think they provide 55A. I've checked some of them on the web and the capacity is usually around 2250mAh. This value doesn’t mean that they provide 2250mA continually; it means that if the load consumes 2250mA, then the battery will be able to provide power to the load for 1 hour.

               

              You should not have issues powering the Edison with a battery of 2250mA (or a similar value), but make sure you are powering the board through the barrel jack. The 5V (and the 3.3V as well) pin header is not an input header. This pin is used to provide power to an external circuit, for example an Arduino Shield.

               

              On the other hand, these kinds of batteries are usually used to power motors and heavy loads. They might not be the most appropriate ones to provide power to light loads like Edison, so you might want to look for other battery options, or for a DC power supply.

               

              Regards,

              Diego

              1 of 1 people found this helpful
              • 4. Re: Powering Edison using a 3S 11.1v LiPo or a 5v BEC connection
                V1N0

                Hello Diego,

                Thank you for your advice, I I'll connect a 9v battery through the barrel jack as I know it does not provide more than 1Amp

                But for educational purposes, I would appreciate it if you could provide me with more information regarding how the board draws power.

                To my limited knowledge on the matter, I was under the impression that all devices have regulators to draw as much power as they need so long as the battery has the capacity to provide it. I also learned that some devices like LEDs will draw power as high As possible until they burn out.

                Then I came across the following statement in the hardware manual:

                image.jpeg

                I also found multiple sources only declaring that:

                image.png

                And since the current rating of my LiPo battery is 25c and the load is 2200mAh which translate into 2.2Amps, the battery has a capacity of 2.2*25 = 55A continuous discharge without getting damaged.

                So putting this in context, does that man that even through the barrel jack, the board will draw more than 1Amp and damage the switch?

                • 5. Re: Powering Edison using a 3S 11.1v LiPo or a 5v BEC connection
                  DiegoV_Intel

                  Hi V1N0,

                   

                  Your understanding is right. Actually, that's the reason why you should always use a resistor in series with the LED, the resistor is used to limit the current.

                   

                  Regarding the following sentence:

                  "This supply was designed for a 1 A continuous supply. Higher currents will generate more power losses and may thermally damage the switcher."

                   

                  It refers to the voltage regulator used to convert the input voltage to a value of 5V. The voltage regulator circuit is the one that has been designed to supply 1A. If I understood you well, you're confused by thinking that the Edison board has to be powered with 1A, and a different value might damage it. The Edison's voltage regulator works like you explained, drawing as much power as it needs.

                   

                  The voltage regulator, in this case, is able to provide 5V@1A, so you could use the output of the voltage regulator (through the 5V output header) to power an external circuit, but without exceeding the 1A total (including the consumption of the on-board circuitry that is connected to the voltage regulator's output).

                   

                  In case you want to check further, here is the datasheet of the Edison's voltage regulator: http://www.ti.com/lit/ds/symlink/tps62133.pdf

                   

                  I hope I have clarified your doubt, but if not, just let me know.

                   

                  Regards,

                  Diego

                  1 of 1 people found this helpful
                  • 6. Re: Powering Edison using a 3S 11.1v LiPo or a 5v BEC connection
                    V1N0

                    Thank you very much, Diego.

                    You are right in that i was confused by thinking that the Edison board has to be powered with 1A, and a different value might damage it.

                    Your responses have been very informative, your help is truly appreciated!