4 Replies Latest reply on Feb 26, 2016 9:25 AM by mark_h_@intel

    Complete list of non-support for W-10

    paramountain

      A number of Intel employees (and one helpful retired one) have commented that Sandy Bridge graphics and 6-series boards will never be supported on Windows 10. This is an important bit of information and something I wish Microsoft would discover. But it begs the question: are Sandy Bridge graphics and 6-series boards outliers or should the statement really be, Sandy Bridge graphics and 6-series boards AND ALL PREVIOUS GENERATIONS AND BOARDS will never be supported on Windows 10?

       

      I have no intention of moving to W-10 so this is not a personal crusade on my part, but people often ask me if they should move to W-10 and I'd like to have as complete of an answer as I can give them. I'm always surprised by people running ancient hardware, especially boards with GMA graphics.

        • 1. Re: Complete list of non-support for W-10
          N.Scott.Pearson

          I had a chuckle as I read this. Based upon observation [Add: of driver availability],

           

          • Celeron, Pentium and Core processors with embedded graphics prior to the Ivy Bridge architecture (i.e. Sandy Bridge and earlier) are not supported on Windows 10.
          • Chipsets with (MCH-based) embedded graphics (i.e. Eagle Lake (4-Series) architecture and earlier) are not supported on Windows 10.
          • Celeron and Atom processors with embedded graphics prior to the Bay Trail architecture (i.e. Cedarview, Pineview, Lincroft and Silverthorne) are not supported on Windows 10.

           

          I (carefully) said "are not supported" because you never know, Intel might be convinced to change their minds on this [I had to say it but... Hah! And one day pigs will fly...]

           

          ...S

          1 of 1 people found this helpful
          • 2. Re: Complete list of non-support for W-10
            paramountain

            Thanks for that detailed response. I had to look-up Bay Trail architecture because I'm only an Intel voyeur, not an insider. Another way of stating #1 is to say that the graphics of all CPUs with lithography larger than 22nm are not supported, but most people probably don't pay attention to the lithography.

             

            Speaking of the devilish W-10, did you hear that Microsoft changed the status of W-10 updates from Optional to Recommended in January? As soon as KB3035583 arrived, I changed Windows Update on all of my PCs to NOT automatically install Recommended updates -- every month I look through the updates to see which ones are worthwhile -- but I'll bet a lot of people got burned that way. I wonder if Microsoft would be so devious as to make its status Important so my cheap trick would no longer work.

            http://www.infoworld.com/article/3028897/microsoft-windows/microsoft-signals-renewed-push-to-force-users-onto-windows-10.html

            • 3. Re: Complete list of non-support for W-10
              N.Scott.Pearson

              Yea, this is pretty slimy. They've screwed up bad and continue to dig the hole deeper and deeper.

              • 4. Re: Complete list of non-support for W-10
                mark_h_@intel

                I've got one of the original Lenovo Yoga 13s. I really love it, but it's beginning to show it's age when it came to upgrading to Windows 10. It's got an i7-3517U (Ivy Bridge) processor. As pointed out above, the Intel HD Graphics drivers for Windows 10 are available for this generation.

                 

                The Yoga came with Windows 8 installed. I wasn't crazy about it, but when Windows 8.1 was released I grew to like the new Windows. I made the mistake of upgrading to Windows 10 when it was new. My Yoga just didn't seem to behave the way I expected after the upgrade. I used my backup partition to go back to Windows 8 and rebuild the PC.

                 

                About a month ago, I upgraded to Windows 10 again. This time the experience with Windows 10 was quite different. Apparently most of the bugs have been worked out. Everything is working like I would expect. I wouldn't think of going back. The worst part is just getting used to the new layout. Moving shutdown to a new place with every version of Windows is a pain. What's funny is that the new location on the Windows menu seems like it's back to where it was in the older versions of Windows.

                 

                I figure I will at least have OS support for an extended period of time now. Nevertheless, the 6th Generation Intel® Core™ processors (aka Skylake) are tempting me to upgrade to a new PC. I guess it's not a matter of if I'll buy a new PC, it's a matter of when.

                 

                Mark