4 Replies Latest reply on Jan 20, 2015 1:33 PM by dferyance

    Why would I buy a Galileo?

    oneoclockjump

      I've been building Arduino projects for a couple of years now, so I feel like I'm past the point of being a beginner. I've had the Galileo (and also the Edison) on my radar for a little while now, but even after a fair bit of Googling, I still can't work out why I would buy a Galileo.

       

      My questions are:

       

      What makes the Galileo Gen 2, not necessarily better than one of the many Arduinos, but different to, say, an Arduino Mega or Yun?

      I found a long article about the Galileo vs the RPi, but not a great deal about Arduinos.

       

      From what I have read about the Galileo, it has the same inputs/outputs as an Uno R3, you can run the same sketches and even use the terrible Arduino IDE, so what can the Galileo do that I can't do with an Arduino?

        • 1. Re: Why would I buy a Galileo?
          dferyance

          It always depends on your purposes for it. I got it because I was intrigued by a cheap (relatively) x86 SBC board in a field full of ARM processors. The Arduino headers is also a nice touch. So I just wanted something different to mess with.

           

          Compared to an Uno or Mega, you have much more RAM and processor capability. It doesn't have only the same IO but has USB, a separate UART, and PCIe. I highly recommend adding the WiFi + Bluetooth PCIe card to it. This gives you USB, WiFi and Bluetooth without having to stack 3 shields together to get it. Compared to the shield cost, it probably will save you money too. Also the USB and networking support is through the OS rather than in the sketch. This gives you much more powerful device and protocol features.

           

          Because it runs Linux, there are many devices and programs you can run that you just cannot on a standard Arduino. The Yun is very different from the other Arduinos. I don't have one to compare so it might be similar to the Galileo. But Compared to the Uno or Mega, Galileo is much more powerful.

           

          While the Galileo is hampered by IO speed, it has these major advantages over the Arduino. The harder question is why get this over the PI or BeagleBone black. I think that is why you have found more information on that. I have all three and have had more fun with the Galileo but I cannot really give you a reason to prefer that over the PI. The PI is popular because it really is a steal.

          • 2. Re: Why would I buy a Galileo?
            Intel_Alvarado

            Hi oneoclockjump,

             

            The Gen 2 board combines the simplicity of Arduino development environment with advanced capabilities of full Linux software stack. There are several differences between the Galileo Gen 2 and the Arduino Yun, like for example in the CPU/RAM. The Gen 2 board has 256MB of RAM. Some applications will be easier in the Galileo since it has a wider variety of ports such as USB 2.0, Ethernet,JTAG,i2C and PCI express. Regarding the OS, the supported OS for the Galileo is Yocto, however you can install other OSs in the Galileo and still post your questions in the forum and find help with users who’ve done the same. You can learn more about Yocto here https://www.yoctoproject.org/ .Regarding the peripherals, both boards are compatible with Arduino family devices, the Galileo also comes with a PCIe port.

             

            The Galileo also has several options for the programming IDE, you can use the Arduino IDE, Node.js,Python, console and c.

            The Gen 2 is also Arduino compatible so you can attach certain shields to the board. Take a look at https://communities.intel.com/docs/DOC-22995 . If you want to take a look at some of the projects being made by the users in the community take a look at https://communities.intel.com/community/makers/galileo/project_gallery .

             

            Regards

            Sergio

            • 3. Re: Why would I buy a Galileo?
              AlastairW

              I asked myself the same question. and the conclusion i came to was use what fits the project. Am just using ins and outs? do i want video out? have a network cable available? wireless ? etc, But more importantly where are you with skills. (i know you said you are past beginner, but i am adding my 2c for othefrs that ask the same)

               

              I don't mind looking at data sheets and wiring things together so i rarely use shields and right or wrong i think they are more aimed at the entry / beginner market, and i am not sure that the entry level would benefit from the extra (functionality and headaches) the OS does bring.

               

              My gen2 galileo was sitting on my desk watching whilst I completed 1 project using an Arduino and another using a Pi.

               

              But If i was just starting out then i think its a good fit - Go the shield and sketch route to get you addicted and then when you get more confident then start digging deeper,



              Alastair


              P.S.


              forgot to mention "can run windows". Now i must say that i have not tried this yet , and i must confess I am a Windows developer by the day, I live in and love Visual studio and am generally a Windows fanboy, but am really not confident that its going to be a whole lot easier. and please please please dont make my embedded device require gigs of updates. But i will be giving it a try.

              • 4. Re: Why would I buy a Galileo?
                dferyance

                AlastairW wrote:

                ...

                forgot to mention "can run windows". Now i must say that i have not tried this yet , and i must confess I am a Windows developer by the day, I live in and love Visual studio and am generally a Windows fanboy, but am really not confident that its going to be a whole lot easier. and please please please dont make my embedded device require gigs of updates. But i will be giving it a try.

                The running of Windows is a unique feature but not as good as it could be. The nice thing about it is being able to use Visual Studio and the Visual Studio debugger. It is quick and easy to get running and that part works great for me. What I don't like is all the limitations that comes with Windows. The Windows API is hit and miss for what is available. There is no kernel hacking or driver development. I don't even thing something like VNC would run on it due to how much was removed from the Windows image. Nifty idea, but even yocto with all its flaws proved to be better.

                 

                I was one of the lucky people who got the Microsoft free Galileo IoT kit. The fact that is has you use an LED without a resistor and warns that it will eventually burn out doesn't instill much confidence.