3 Replies Latest reply on May 2, 2016 1:44 PM by ivanu_intel

    I need some clarification on Intel FPO/batch codes

    C@rnage

      Below is some information on reading batch codes. Most of it appears to be correct, but I've read numerous reports of the 5th digit on the FPO line being an actual core stepping code. I currently have a Xeon x5470 processor which reads " 3834A893" on the FPO line. My question is what does the "A" represent as I have seen other Intel processors with A,B,C embedded on the heat spreader just before the lot number which would be "893" ? I read several reports claiming this a core stepping code as well as this possibly being part of the lot number itself. Some also claim that "E0" to be the core stepping but this is in fact the stepping revision. Can someone please clarify this with some sort of official documentaion so that I may lay alot of rumors and speculation to rest. Thanks in advance

       

       

       

       

      Example: L149A463-0726

       

      1st letter or digit = plant code (Malay)

      0 = San Jose, Costa Rica

      1 = Cavite, Philippines

      3 = .............., Costa Rica

      6 = Chandler, Arizona

      7 = .........., Philippines

      8 = Leixlip, Ireland

      9 = Penang, Malaysia

      L = ............, Malaysia

      Q = ..........., Malaysia

      R = Manila, Philippines

      Y = Leixlip, Ireland

       

      2nd digit = Year of production (2001)

       

      3rd & 4th digits = week (49th week )

       

      5th - 8th digits= lot number

       

      10th - 13th digits = serialization code

        • 1. Re: I need some clarification on Intel FPO/batch codes
          sylvia_intel

          Thanks for the questions.

           

          First, a little clarification.  The FPO (a.k.a. batch) number is printed on the metal heat spreader on our desktop processors (it may be in a different place on mobile processors).  It is only 8 characters and does not include any ‘serialization code’.

           

          We do sometimes print a serial number on our CPU’s (usually on a black strip, next to a ‘2D matrix’ barcode, but it is not present on all processor models.  You can’t count on it being there.

           

          Now to your question.  The 5th digit of the FPO number is unrelated to the core stepping of the CPU.  It is simply part of the 4 digit batch numbers for that work week.

              

          • 2. Re: I need some clarification on Intel FPO/batch codes
            pbystrom

            Silvia,

            I need some clarification on what you mean by the 5th digit of the FPO is unrelated to the Stepping core, but that it is part of the 4 digit batch number of that work week. If that is so then the following FPO on I/O Controller Hub 5 (L3110081) reads like the following.

             

            1st letter or digit = plant code (Malay)

            0 = San Jose, Costa Rica

            1 = Cavite, Philippines

            3 = .............., Costa Rica

            6 = Chandler, Arizona

            7 = .........., Philippines

            8 = Leixlip, Ireland

            9 = Penang, Malaysia

            L = ............, Malaysia

            Q = ..........., Malaysia

            R = Manila, Philippines

            Y = Leixlip, Ireland

             

            2nd digit = Year of production (2003)

             

            3rd -5th the work week. Week 110.

             

            6th - 8th serial code.

             

            I ask since we do not have 110 weeks in a year.

            Please let me know if that is how to interpret the 5th digit?

            • 3. Re: I need some clarification on Intel FPO/batch codes
              ivanu_intel

              The first character (number or letter) belongs to the manufacturing country.

              The second number is the manufacturing year.

              The third and fourth numbers are the work week.

              The rest of the characters are for internal use

               

              Regards,

               

              Ivan