10 Replies Latest reply on Aug 26, 2013 2:40 PM by Fernando

    In non-RAID, what does RST do over stock SATA drivers?

    wwwhy

      Particularly in non-RAID configurations, what does RST do that stock Win8 (or Win7) SATA drivers don't do?

       

      What's the function of IAStorDataMgrSvr.exe? Can the core drivers function properly without this service?

       

      I assume IAStorIcon.exe is for the tray icon. If that's the case, why is it running also when the tray icon is disabled?

        • 1. Re: In non-RAID, what does RST do over stock SATA drivers?
          joe_intel

          Hello,

           

          There is no advantage of using Intel® RST if you are not going to use RAID volumes.

           

          If you do not need IRST and do not want those services to be running in the background, you may just uninstall the software as otherwise modifying the services may cause unwanted behavior in the software.

          • 2. Re: In non-RAID, what does RST do over stock SATA drivers?
            Merwinsson

            Let me elaborate on what Joe is telling you...

             

            Not only is there little to no advantage to running the Intel RST drivers, but once you've installed them, you're STUCK with them (with only one possible out).  You see, for reasons I can only speculate upon, Intel decided to NOT make the RST installation process reversible.  So, even if you DO uninstall RST, it's still driving your SATA devices anyways.  The only thing the uninstaller really does is to remove the UI app and the tray icon, that's it.  Neato, huh?

             

            Now, if you were lucky enough to have system restore active, and have a pre-RST-install restore point, and if going back to that point is not painful to you, then you can use that to revert.  Such was not the case for me, as you might have guessed.

             

            So, about the "little" advantage mentioned above?  Well, you can run the RST UI to obtain a very nice graphical view of your SATA setup, and also view and/or change some SATA settings that are normally buried and not easy to access.  Performance wise, though, I have not noticed a significant difference between using RST and the default Windows driver when running in non RAID.

            • 3. Re: In non-RAID, what does RST do over stock SATA drivers?
              Fernando

              Merwinsson schrieb:

               

              Not only is there little to no advantage to running the Intel RST drivers, but once you've installed them, you're STUCK with them (with only one possible out).  You see, for reasons I can only speculate upon, Intel decided to NOT make the RST installation process reversible.  So, even if you DO uninstall RST, it's still driving your SATA devices anyways.  The only thing the uninstaller really does is to remove the UI app and the tray icon, that's it.  Neato, huh?

              That is absolutely not true.

              After having uninstalled the RST Software via Control Panel it is no problem to replace the RST driver itself from within the Device Manager by the generic MS AHCI driver (if the SATA Controller  is running in AHCI mode) or by the generic Intel RAID driver iaStorV.sys (if the SATA Controller is running in RAID mode).

              Contrary to your opinion it makes really sense, that the RST driver will not be removed, when the "Intel(R) Rapid Storage Technology" software will be uninstalled from within the Control Panel. Otherwise an Intel RAID user would not be able to boot into the Operating System, which has been installed onto a RAID array.

              • 4. Re: In non-RAID, what does RST do over stock SATA drivers?
                wwwhy

                Thanks joe. Is there no advantage both on Win8 and Win7? No improvements in performance, features (TRIM, whatever), power management, compatibility/support (GPT, 4K sectors, >2TB)?

                 

                Can you detail a bit about the function of these specific services/programs? And what unwanted behavior? For example, on WinXP I didn't install the full driver package yet, just the F6 setup drivers. It seems to suffice so far.

                 

                Merwinsson, in theory I don't mind leaving just the core Intel drivers. My main beef is those extra running processes of unknown function. I shouldn't care about internals such as these, but we haven't yet reached a stage where one can assume whatever extras drivers run is useful and will have no adverse effects, even if those might be just a bit more system resource usage.

                • 5. Re: In non-RAID, what does RST do over stock SATA drivers?
                  Merwinsson

                  "it is no problem to replace the RST driver itself from within the Device Manager by the generic MS AHCI driver"

                   

                  I stand corrected if this is true.  My experience has been trying to uninstall RST when the BIOS was in RAID mode.  I still don't see why this is not possible because Windows 7 and 8 will install when the BIOS is in RAID mode, without having to use the Intel driver, so, why wouldn't you be able to revert back to that once you install RST?


                  • 6. Re: In non-RAID, what does RST do over stock SATA drivers?
                    Fernando

                    Merwinsson schrieb:

                     

                    I stand corrected if this is true.  My experience has been trying to uninstall RST when the BIOS was in RAID mode.  I still don't see why this is not possible because Windows 7 and 8 will install when the BIOS is in RAID mode, without having to use the Intel driver, so, why wouldn't you be able to revert back to that once you install RST?

                    You are absolutely wrong.

                    It is impossible to install any Windows Operating System onto an Intel RAID system without using an Intel RAID driver, because none of the OS's has an MS RAID driver on board. Such MS RAID driver - comparable with the MS AHCI driver - never existed and probably will never do. The fact, that you can install Vista, Win7 and Win8 onto an Intel RAID system (except actual Intel Chipset ones in UEFI mode) without the need of loading any separate Intel RAID driver, is caused by the presence of an Intel MSM RAID driver named iaStorV.sys as part of the OS. You can find this driver within the Windows\System32\Drivers folder of all fresh installed Windows Operating Systems (since Vista). This Intel RAID driver named iaStorV.sys is the one Win7 and Win8 are using to detect and to manage the Intel RAID system.

                    • 7. Re: In non-RAID, what does RST do over stock SATA drivers?
                      Merwinsson

                      Thank you for making the distinction that there is no MS RAID driver that is part of Windows, and that it is actually a pre-packaged Intel driver that is allowing Windows to install to Intel RAID systems in RAID mode since Vista.

                       

                      But I don't know how this affects my original assertion that you can't undo an RST install (if you are in RAID mode).  For instance, I installed a 12.X RST package, and was then unable to get rid of it, so I could go back to a 11.X package.

                      • 8. Re: In non-RAID, what does RST do over stock SATA drivers?
                        Fernando

                        Merwinsson schrieb:

                         

                        But I don't know how this affects my original assertion that you can't undo an RST install (if you are in RAID mode).  For instance, I installed a 12.X RST package, and was then unable to get rid of it, so I could go back to a 11.X package.

                        Usually it is no problem to uninstall any Intel RST Software via "Add/Remove Programs", but you should never try to uninstall the Intel RAID driver from within the Device Manager, if you have a RAID system, because the OS needs a RAID driver while rebooting.

                        If you are not able to get the RST Software uninstalled, the installation hasn't been properly done. In this case I recommend to re-install the RST Software you want to get rid off on top of the other, then reboot and uninstall the Software at least by running the "Add/Remove Programs" feature. I am pretty sure, that you will succeed this way.

                        EDIT:

                        A problem may occur, if you try to replace an actual Intel RST(e) package v11,5 or higher (with additional SCSI Filter driver) by a conventional Intel RST package without such SCSI Filter driver (latest version: 11.2.0.1006), because the SCSI Filter driver registry entries may not be properly removed.

                        • 9. Re: In non-RAID, what does RST do over stock SATA drivers?
                          Merwinsson

                          Let's say, for example, that you had a clean system booting off a RAID volume, and have just installed RST 12.X, only to discover it has bugs, so you decide to go back to having a clean system (use of the default Windows supplied Intel driver).  There appears to be no way to go back.  The installer does not remove the driver.  Why would it not do this, as there is a default driver to fall back upon.

                           

                          And since you seem to know so much about RST, can you verify my understanding of these device keys.

                           

                          iaStor     Classical pre-11.5 RST driver

                          iaStorA     Newer 11.5+ RST driver (non-filter part)

                          iaStorF     Newer 11.5+ RST driver (filter part)

                          iaStorV     Windows supplied default Intel RAID driver

                           

                          I have ALL these keys on one of my systems, and I am wondering which are not needed.  For instance, since I am using 11.7 on this system, can I delete iaStor and turn iaStorV OFF?

                          • 10. Re: In non-RAID, what does RST do over stock SATA drivers?
                            Fernando

                            Merwinsson schrieb:

                             

                            Let's say, for example, that you had a clean system booting off a RAID volume, and have just installed RST 12.X, only to discover it has bugs, so you decide to go back to having a clean system (use of the default Windows supplied Intel driver).  There appears to be no way to go back.  The installer does not remove the driver.  Why would it not do this, as there is a default driver to fall back upon.

                            The "Add/Remove Programs" option is just for software and not for drivers. The RST package installer installs the driver(s) and the software, but the uninstall procedure affects just the RST software. If you want to uninstall a driver, you always have to use the Device Manager. That is good for many users, because the "fall back to iaStorV" mechanism wouldn't work for all Intel RAID systems.

                            I personally have an Intel Z77 RAID0 system and install the RST software only once, when I do a fresh install of the OS, and use it for just for a few secondes to enable the Write-Back Caching. After having done it, I uninstall the RST software at once and would be very sad, if there would be the need of a reinstallation of the Intel RAID driver, which brings the best performance for my system.

                            Merwinsson schrieb:

                             

                            And since you seem to know so much about RST, can you verify my understanding of these device keys.

                            iaStor     Classical pre-11.5 RST driver

                            iaStorA     Newer 11.5+ RST driver (non-filter part)

                            iaStorF     Newer 11.5+ RST driver (filter part)

                            iaStorV     Windows supplied default Intel RAID driver

                            I have ALL these keys on one of my systems, and I am wondering which are not needed.  For instance, since I am using 11.7 on this system, can I delete iaStor and turn iaStorV OFF?

                            The Win7/8 in-box Intel RAID driver iaStorV is part of the OS and cannot be uninstalled, because it is the generic OS emergency driver for Intel RAID systems. If you have installed at any time a classical Intel RST RAID driver (iaStor) and one of the more actual Intel RST(e) drivers (iaStorA + iaStorF), all these drivers and the related INF files will remain present within the Windows directory of your system drive, but this doesn't mean, that they all are used while you are working with your computer. So there is neither a need nor a reason to uninstall any of the Intel RAID drivers, which are not actually in use, but may be needed, if your system should crash due to a buggy Intel RAID driver version.