1 Reply Latest reply on May 18, 2012 10:25 AM by phil_l

    High idle temp in the BIOS with i5-3570k

    saebasan

      Hello,

       

      I made up a new installation with an Core i5-3570k, 4Go DDR3-1333, on a Biostar TH67XE motherboard. No overclocking.

      In the bios the idle temperature is incredibily high.  50°c...

      Doing nothing.

       

      Before to update the bios of the motherboard I used a Pentium G620 on it, the idle was 26~30°c.  That sounds more normal for a fresh and clean installation without overclocking...

       

      What the problem?  That's not normal.

      What should I do from now?

       

      Regards

        • 1. Re: High idle temp in the BIOS with i5-3570k
          phil_l

          Hi

           

          It can take several days of cycling for the thermal interface material to bed in on a new build and allow the best contact between CPU and heat-sink, so reported temperatures can drop given some time.

           

          Also when in the BIOS, even though it isn't doing much, few of the power-saving functions are enabled by the tiny BIOS operating system, so idle temperatures are exaggerated.  When you boot an ACPI operating system like Windows 7 that enables all the power-saving functions at idle the CPU shuts itself down and so your idle temperatures are lower.  What are you idle temperatures when running normally?

           

          It's very hard to compare temperatures between different CPUs as it depends on accuracy of the sensor, where the sensor is on the CPU, and different CPUs are designed to run at different temperatures. The Ivy Bridge has a lot more transistors packed into a much smaller area, so it has hotter hot-spots, and overall will run hotter even if it is drawing less power, as the heat is concentrated in a smaller area.   The tendency is also to let the CPU idle warmer as it doesn't harm the CPU and allows for a slower fan and so lower noise levels.

           

          My i7 3770 idles at around 50 degrees in the BIOS, and in Windows 7 typing this email it reads 38 degrees.  Under full load it will reach 90 degrees where the fan than ramps up, and then it stays around 85-90 degrees until the work load is finished.

           

          Regards

           

          Phil