2 Replies Latest reply on May 7, 2012 6:36 PM by Magnus_stout

    DH67BL (B3) + Ivy Bridge = Disappointment...

    Magnus_stout

      According to Intel documentation, Ivy Bridge should be supported with the Intel DH67BLB3....

       

      In my HTPC, I've had Sandy Bridge (I3-2100) running flawlessly for about 5 months with that mobo... At work, I have a 2500k with Intel DZ68BC. Same story: flawless performance and a very stable board.

       

      Well, I got a good deal on an I5-3570K and decided to take the plunge and replace my I3, since I was doing a lot of encoding to shrink my HDTV recordings. No problem, right? Well, updated the BIOS (no problem), but spent several hours last night troubleshooting a problem: my DH67BLB3 will automatically reboot if I put it under maximum load with Prime95.

       

      Here is what I've established: reset BIOS to all defaults, boot into Windows 7 safe mode, start Prime95, select "stress testing" and select "4 threads." BOOM! It will automatically reboot within 5 minutes (usually a minute or less). BTW, the temps on the cores never exceed 63 C, and I have good cooling and power supply.

       

      Okay, it gets weirder... If I only stress one core in Prime, it seems to run OK for a while. Reading some problems with this BIOS and other Z68/H67 boards, I understand that Turbo Boost may be part of the problem. So, I disabled TurboBoost. But, with all cores stressed, it still reboots.

       

      This board has never given me problems before.... I believe we are looking at some sort of a BIOS issue. BIOS defaults + Windows safe mode should equal stability...

       

      Unfortunately, given the slow pace of BIOS updates, I cannot wait for a BIOS udate to fix this board. So, I purchased a new Z77 motherboard from Gigabyte. This experience has left a bad taste in my mouth for Intel motherboards. While I am a huge fan of Intel's CPUs & SSD's, it seems like their motherboards don't get the same quality treatment as Intel's other products. I can only guess that some sort of OEM manufacturer (Foxconn?) and "support contract" are to blame.

       

      I expect better, expecially since most people would equate Intel's name with quality. It seems Ivy Bridge support is only half-baked...

        • 1. Re: DH67BL (B3) + Ivy Bridge = Disappointment...
          Victor_Intel

          Hello Magnus_stout,

           

          I understand that you are disappointed because you are experiencing issues with your new Intel® Core™ i5-3570K Processor and the Intel(R) Desktop Board DH67BL when running a stress test.

           

          I'm sorry to hear that you are disappointed about this, I can confirm to you that Intel(R) is making a big effort to make older motherboards fully compatible with the newer processors, some configurations may still have some glitches that need to be addressed on the run.

           

          I appreciate your honest feedback and I will make sure that it reaches the proper department.

           

          To anyone else that is having similar problems remember to post your full system configuration so that we can look in to the problem.

           

          Regards.

           

          PV

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          • 2. Re: DH67BL (B3) + Ivy Bridge = Disappointment...
            Magnus_stout

            Hi PV,

             

            Thanks for responding. I appreciate that you have forwarded my information to the proper department.

             

            Intel needs to improve it's motherboard reputation with "power users." After all, most of us make recommendations to family and friends about computer products. But, I understand that Intel must be careful not to upset it's business partners (Asus, Gigabyte, Asrock, etc...). That said, I think a quote from Steve Jobs captures my feeling:

             

            "You make some of the best products in the world — but you also make a lot of crap. Get rid of the crappy stuff." to Nike
            —As said to Mark Parker, The Innovation Secrets of Steve Jobs

             

            Intel is too good to make second-rate products; it's also too good to make first-rate products but support them as second-rate. Either go first-rate all the way or get out of the game.