4 Replies Latest reply: Dec 30, 2013 6:06 PM by TheEngineer RSS

Super High Heat with Ivy Bridge i5 3570K

wingcom Community Member
Currently Being Moderated

Ok, I am running on stock speed 3.4GHz with a stock fan equipped. I bought this processor just for gaming purposes but surprisingly whenever I launch my game(e.g. SC2) even it is just at the main menu the temperature will shoot up over 90C on each core and overall CPU temp is at 70C and increasing.

 

From that point onwards, I dare not continue playing and straight terminate the game.

 

 

I have no heat issue on my previous processor which is i5-2400 even with Turbo Boost enabled.

 

 

Please do not tell me INTEL claimed that IB will produce more heat comparing to SB. I buy 3570K to enjoy the Turbo boost feature or even thinking of OC in the future. As a matter a fact, I just can't go any further even at stock speed with the high heat issue during gaming.

 

I also get to know that from overclockers.com, they suspect rootcause is the TIM paste between the die and IHS.

I am very disappointed and very not satisfy with IVY brige. If this product is not ready, please do not release it to the market!!!

 

 

I would seriously hope that INTEL will resolve this issue soon and recall those processor that has such problem.

 

 

My processor details:

S/N: 2L152Y03A3980

Batch#: L204B413

 

Another thing to note, on the BOX, I saw the it stated that i5-3570K is 95W, but from CPUID and forum discussion, ain't it suppose to be 77W????

 

 

Hope to hear an official reply from INTEL.

  • 1. Re: Super High Heat with Ivy Bridge i5 3570K
    Alvaro_Intel Community Member
    Currently Being Moderated

    In this case, we need to pay attention on the Temperature received for the whole Processor, not on the core Temperatures.  This Temperature will increase depending on the tasks and programs. For this Processor, the maximum normal Temperature is around 72 and 75 °C.

     

    There are many reports from forums and different articles from overclockers reporting this issue. However, at this point there are no official reports from Intel® about over heating on these products. Please keep in mind that when a processor is overclocked it will increase the core voltage at the cost of system stability, power consumption and heat dissipation. This overvolting, generally involves running a processor out of its specifications, which may damage it or shorten CPU life.

     

    Also, we have confirmed that the labeling information for some products was just a mistake.  The CPU that you have actually has a 77W TDP.

  • 2. Re: Super High Heat with Ivy Bridge i5 3570K
    wingcom Community Member
    Currently Being Moderated

    True regarding all the facts that you had mentioned but as compared to SB, consumers, at least I have a higher expectation from a lower powered, 22nm processor to be able to overclock with better performance and lower heat dissipation.

     

     

    I guess I had a wrong perception already...anyway, with the fear of killing my IB, I had just left my 3570K processor to run on stock speed with a non-stock cooling fan.

  • 3. Re: Super High Heat with Ivy Bridge i5 3570K
    phil_l Community Member
    Currently Being Moderated

    Hi

    wingcom wrote:

     

    True regarding all the facts that you had mentioned but as compared to SB, consumers, at least I have a higher expectation from a lower powered, 22nm processor to be able to overclock with better performance and lower heat dissipation.

     

     

    I guess I had a wrong perception already...anyway, with the fear of killing my IB, I had just left my 3570K processor to run on stock speed with a non-stock cooling fan.

     

    Usually when you have high expectations they are not met, that is a fact of life.

     

    Intel has made no claims about the overclockability of Ivy Bridge, and the advice now from sites that have reviewed Ivy Bridge is there is little point in upgrading from Sandy Bridge to Ivy Bridge.

     

    22nm processor fabrication is about reducing power consumption and so waste heat, as well as allowing more chips from a wafer to reduce costs.  It also allows for larger caches and more elaborate CPU designs which we see with Ivy Bridge, for example better integrated graphics.  Shrinking to 22nm also means getting heat away from that smaller area is more of a challenge, and the on chip temperature sensors will be at the hottest part of the CPU and so will report higher temperatures due to the closely packed transistors.  Overall the waste heat output is lower than Sandy Bridge (77 Watt compared to 95 Watt) while being slightly better performance, 22nm has achieved it's goal.

     

    Overclocking is a gamble, and no one from Intel has ever made claims that Ivy Bridge will overclock more than Sandy Bridge, so there is no point complaining here about it, Ivy Bridge is what it is

     

    Regards

     

    Phil

  • 4. Re: Super High Heat with Ivy Bridge i5 3570K
    TheEngineer Community Member
    Currently Being Moderated

    The i5-3570k has great OC'ing capabilities.  You need two things though:

     

    1) Better thermal paste.  Arctic Silver is the best to use, make sure you use the correct amount.

    2) A better cooler.  I recommend a water cooled closed loop system like Corsairs H60.

     

    Also make sure when all three units meet they are not only Snug, but lightly torqued.

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