7 Replies Latest reply on Jun 8, 2011 12:50 AM by kbellis

    What Are the Cons of Matrix RAID?

    kbellis

      A few days ago I reconfigured my RAID1 setup to a RAID0 with the kind help of Edward here at Intel.

       

      Initially, I had considered the option of a Matrix RAID, but it came at the  expense of .5 TB of storage capacity (in my case utilizing 2 1-TB WD HDDs) while any other disadvantages were  not articulated in all of my research here and elsewhere online. The mirror-like enabling software (WD's SmartWare) on the 2 TB (USB 3)  WD MyBook looked like a viable alternative in the mitigation of the risk of data loss; however, I've only been using it for the past few days and am aware of at least one of its weaknesses. Presently, there emerges enough of an issue with drive not being alsways recognized by the OS that now compels me to consider once a matrix RAID solution. Now I wonder about  the complications inherent in that configuration.

       

      http://www.intel.com/support/chipsets/imsm/sb/img/matrixraid_0and1.gif

       

      In the diagram above, both applications and data sets are shown in the  two types of RAID volumes. In the recently updated article "How to set up a system with matrix RAID"  there are no indications (or external links) of how the system or the  user will discern when to employ one volume or another, when not to, or  if there's any means of setting up rules, defaults, etc. Is the user  faced at every turn; whether installing an application or saving a  file, to decide which volume type to use at that moment?

       

      Thank you for any reply.

       

      Kind regards,

       

      Kelly

        • 1. Re: What Are the Cons of Matrix RAID?
          Dan_O

          Are you asking the pros and cons of using Matrix RAID, versus some other type of RAID (hardware, ESRT2, etc)?

           

          Or the pros and cons of using RAID 0 vs RAID 1?

          • 2. Re: What Are the Cons of Matrix RAID?
            kbellis

            Yes, although the pros are obvious - it's the cons that aren't.

            • 3. Re: What Are the Cons of Matrix RAID?
              Dan_O

              The cons of Matrix RAID vs ESRT2 RAID?  Or the cons of RAID 0 vs RAID 1?  I am not fully understanding your question yet.

              • 4. Re: What Are the Cons of Matrix RAID?
                kbellis

                Hi Dan,

                 

                Thank you for the reply.

                 

                I think you brought up the ESRT2 RAID - I've never heard of it.

                 

                Please refer to my initial post and these questions regarding a Matrix RAID:

                 

                Questions concerning a Matrix RAID

                How does the system or the  user discern when to employ one volume or  another, when not to, or  if there's any means of setting up rules,  defaults, etc.

                 

                Is the user faced at every turn; whether installing an  application or saving a  file, to decide which volume type to use at  that moment?

                • 5. Re: What Are the Cons of Matrix RAID?
                  Doc_SilverCreek

                  Check out http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RAID

                   

                  RAID can be very confusing. Almost like buying an auto. (compact, sports car, mini van, full size, pick-up)

                  Hauling concreate in a compact car is no fun

                  and comutting 60 miles to work in the pick-up at 10 MPG is not a good idea either.

                   

                  The big question is what you are trying to achieve.

                  Speed, redundancy\reliability, or size.

                  Which type of RAID you create is will generate trade off between these parameters.

                   

                  Raid basics 101:

                  Best:   Hardware RAID - Raid is controlled by the hardware, has its own memory and battery back up and the CPU is not burdened

                  Better: Chipset Raid \ matrix raid - Controller on the mother board does most the RAID work, but CPU has some involvement

                  Good: Software Raid  - OS does the Raid and all the work is done by the CPU.

                   

                  (2 HDD system)

                  The basic 2 RAIDs are:

                  RAID 0: Pro: is a Mirror all the data is written to both HDD so nothing gets lost. CON: You only get 1/2 the total disk space since every thing is mirrored and write times are slightly slower than no raid.

                  RAID 1: or striped RAID -- PRO:  1/2 the info is written to each HDD so drive access is faster, space is nearly the same as 2 separate HDD. CON: Lose one drive and you lose all your data from both drives.

                   

                  Going beyond 2 drives in the RAID 2-6 plus the hybrids RAID 7 - 30  gives you opportunity minimize the negative impacts or share the positive impacts.

                  If you want redundancy / Data security, you pay for it in total drive space abd to a lesser extent, speed.

                  If you want speed, the cost is drive space or redundancy.

                   

                  3 or more drives in a RAID 5 or RAID 10 are what I normally see when people want the best of everything.

                  1 of 1 people found this helpful
                  • 6. Re: What Are the Cons of Matrix RAID?
                    edwardzh

                    Once you create two RAID volumes, each one appears as a physical disk to OS. RAID level is transparent to OS - Windows doesn't know which one is RIAD 1 and which one is RAID 0. You can partition each volume just like you do on a physical hard disk. Let's say you'll have C: drive (RAID 1 volume) and D: drive (RAID 0 volume). It's your decision what to put on C: drive (normally OS, documents, photos, important data you don't want to lose) or D: drive (page files, games, movies, any data you can afford losing).

                    • 7. Re: What Are the Cons of Matrix RAID?
                      kbellis

                      Thank you Doc and Edward both for your replies. They are much appreciated.

                       

                      Kind regards,

                       

                      Kelly