5 Replies Latest reply on May 3, 2011 11:24 PM by Tima

    Physical partitioning and Intel Xeon processors

    Tima

      Dears,

       

      HP machine with 2 Xeon CPU & Windows OS. Is it possible to implement physical partitioning on such machine? In otherwords, does XEON CPU support partitioning?

       

      Thanks for your time.

        • 1. Re: Physical partitioning and Intel Xeon processors
          Tima

          Dears,

           

          Could you pls? Nobody have idea?

           

          Thanks.

          • 2. Re: Physical partitioning and Intel Xeon processors
            Doc_SilverCreek

            Not sure I understand your question. Can you elaborate on what your trying to do?

            • 3. Re: Physical partitioning and Intel Xeon processors

              Thanks for your reply.

               

              “Partitioning” occurs when the CPUs (a.k.a. processors) on a server are separated into individual sections where each section acts as a separate system. Sometimes this is also called “segmenting.”

               

              Types of Partitioning
              There are two main types of partitioning available.
              Soft Partitioning:
              Soft partitioning segments the operating system using OS resource managers. The operating system limits the number of CPUs where an Oracle database is running by creating areas where CPU resources are allocated to applications within the same operating system. The database administrator can set the number of CPUs to the number of licensed CPUs. This is a flexible way of managing data processing resources since the CPU capacity can be changed fairly easily, as additional resource is needed.
              Examples of such partitioning type include: and Solaris 9 Resource Containers, AIX Workload Manager, HP Process Resource Manager, Affinity Management, Oracle VM, VMware etc. This is not a comprehensive list of all the different types of technologies or resource allocation devices/programs that would fall into the category of Soft Partitioning.

               

              Hard Partitioning:
              Hard partitioning physically segments a server, by taking a single large server and separating it into distinct smaller systems. Each separated system acts as a physically independent, self-contained server, typically with its own CPUs, operating system, separate boot area, memory, input/output subsystem and network resources.
              Examples of such partitioning type include: Dynamic System Domains (DSD) -- enabled by Dynamic Reconfiguration (DR), Solaris 10 Containers (capped Containers only), LPAR (adds DLPAR with AIX 5.2), Micro-Partitions (capped partitions only), vPar, nPar, Integrity Virtual Machine (capped partitions only), Secure Resource Partitions (capped partitions only), Static Hard Partitioning, etc.

               

               

              Now, my question is: if I have HP machine with 2 Xeon CPU, is it possible to implement HARD Partitioning?

               

               

               

              Thanks.

              • 4. Re: Physical partitioning and Intel Xeon processors
                Tima

                Thanks for your reply.

                 

                “Partitioning” occurs when  the CPUs (a.k.a. processors) on a server are separated into individual  sections where each section acts as a separate system. Sometimes this is  also called “segmenting.”

                 

                Types of Partitioning
                There are two main types of partitioning available.
                Soft  Partitioning:
                Soft partitioning segments the operating system using OS resource  managers. The operating system limits the number of CPUs where an Oracle  database is running by creating areas where CPU resources are allocated  to applications within the same operating system. The database  administrator can set the number of CPUs to the number of licensed CPUs.  This is a flexible way of managing data processing resources since the  CPU capacity can be changed fairly easily, as additional resource is  needed.
                Examples of such partitioning type include: and Solaris 9 Resource  Containers, AIX Workload Manager, HP Process Resource Manager, Affinity  Management, Oracle VM, VMware etc. This is not a comprehensive list of  all the different types of technologies or resource allocation  devices/programs that would fall into the category of Soft Partitioning.

                 

                Hard Partitioning:
                Hard partitioning physically segments a server, by taking a single large  server and separating it into distinct smaller systems. Each separated  system acts as a physically independent, self-contained server,  typically with its own CPUs, operating system, separate boot area,  memory, input/output subsystem and network resources.
                Examples of such partitioning type include: Dynamic System Domains (DSD)  -- enabled by Dynamic Reconfiguration (DR), Solaris 10 Containers  (capped Containers only), LPAR (adds DLPAR with AIX 5.2),  Micro-Partitions (capped partitions only), vPar, nPar, Integrity Virtual  Machine (capped partitions only), Secure Resource Partitions (capped  partitions only), Static Hard Partitioning, etc.

                 

                 

                Now,  my question is: if I have HP machine with 2 Xeon CPU, is it possible to  implement HARD Partitioning?

                 

                 

                 

                Thanks.

                • 5. Re: Physical partitioning and Intel Xeon processors
                  Doc_SilverCreek

                  Well, I don't think I can help you, based on what I am reading.

                  I am pretty much a Intel hardware guy and this seems to be an OS question.

                   

                  As I am reading this and doing some googling, in both cases they are running some software \ OS to create containers or partitions of a system in which different OS / applications can reside.

                   

                  The resources of the base hardware are dynamically allocated in the Soft Partitioning by the controlling code \ VM but fixed in the Hard Partitioning by the controlling code \ VM can not modify the partitioning once created?

                   

                  Seems like different names for the same end result base on who's software you buy.

                   

                  If by hard partitioning they mean the part about physically separating the cpu / resources so that you would have 2 processors each with its own memory and I/O and BIOS on the same board, but not sharing the same busses for the processors. memory, I/O (i.e 2 separate computers on the same board), I have never seen one. but it possiable in larger main frame type system. I seen systems that incorporate multiple blades of independent servers in a common chassis and even 1u servers that contain 2 completely separate severs in the same chassis. I seen redundant power, redundant memory, redundant HDD, redundant NICs in may dual xeon servers, but the busses are always common and seperate OSes are via VM style software.

                   

                  The HP's web site indicated that your server is a rp74/rx7600, rp84/rx8600 or Superdome servers and supports Solaris 10 or nPAR, I would say your good with hard Partitioning. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HP_nPar_(Hard_Partitioning)

                   

                  Sorry I can't be more help.