5 Replies Latest reply on Aug 9, 2010 9:14 AM by Victor_Intel

    DP35DP alarm sound problem

    vladimir.gjurovski

      Hi,

       

      I'm using Intel DP35DP MB with Q6600 CPU mounted. I'm using it for 2 years now and recently I'm experiencing an alarm sound from the MB  internal speaker when I play games. The PC doesn't shut down. I ALT+TAB the game and it instantly stops. My suspicion is that the temperature inside is high. I have installed the Intel Desktop utilities and the temps are within the default set margins of the program.

       

      Processor thermal margin 15-20 degrees

      MB temp 68 degrees

      I/O controller hub   80 degrees

       

      Memory controller hub   75 degrees

       

      CPU fan is 1200-2200 rpm

       

      Are these temps normal?

      Has anyone experienced this alarm sound? (4-5 repeated sounds in sequence)

      Are the CPU fan rpm's normal?

       

      Please advise.

       

      Running Windows 7 64bit Ultimate

        • 1. Re: DP35DP alarm sound problem
          Victor_Intel

          The processor thermal specification seems a little low meaning that your processor is running hot. The power supply may not be cooling down you processor correctly.

           

          the main problem that I see is that the motherboard temperature is 68 degrees, this seems to be high, you need to lower this by improving the airflow on your chassis. Cooling down your chassis will make your processor colder as the Heat Sink will be blowing cooler air in to the Heat Sink.

           

          PV.

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          • 2. Re: DP35DP alarm sound problem
            vladimir.gjurovski

            Thank you for your answer.

             

            I opened the chassis and left it open for better ventilation while the temps outside are high. I also cleaned my case fan and the cpu fan. The CPU thermal margin is now at 34 degrees and MB temp is 58 degrees.

             

            What do you mean by power supply isn't cooling my CPU?

             

            What has the PS got to do with the CPU temp?

             

            The PS has it own fan that distributes the hot air out of the chassis.

            • 3. Re: DP35DP alarm sound problem
              Victor_Intel

              Sorry, it was a typo. The Heat Sink may not be cooling down the processor correctly.

               

              Having the chassis open may not be the best way to lower the temperature inside the chassis, as you will loose the airflow that is designed to bring cold air from the front and throw the hot air on the back. In your case it seems like you don't have a front chassis fan, this can help a lot by bringing cold air to your chassis, and the power supply should be able to take the hot air out the chassis but you can also use a rear chassis fan.

               

              It seems like the whole problme in your computer is the airflow as you did see an improvement on the temperature once you opened the chassis.

              • 4. Re: DP35DP alarm sound problem
                vladimir.gjurovski

                You are right. I have no front case fan. There also doesn't seem to be a proper place to mount one. I have one mounted in the back of the case to throw out the excess hot air.

                 

                I only have this problem when the temps out are high.

                 

                The thing thats bothering me is the CPU fan rpm's....are these rpm's (see previous writing) enough?

                 

                I think that the CPU fan control is rather slow and the fan speeds up rather late.

                • 5. Re: DP35DP alarm sound problem
                  Victor_Intel

                  The fan should be able to get a little higher than that. This will depend on the fan control of the motherboard and the actual fan. Some fans will not go very fast to keep the noise levels low. Still you can play with the fan detection in BIOS and change it to always and make sure that you have the latest BIOS.

                   

                  PV.