1 2 Previous Next 16 Replies Latest reply on Sep 24, 2018 1:40 PM by Intel Corporation

    intel ssd 600p series nvme driver

    kcelestin

      I bought from amazon an m.2 to pcie 3.0 adapter so i could a newly obtained ssd stick. the white stick on the ssd stick says intel ssd 600p series. On the product page it says "Support Windows XP/7/8/10. ( If there is a exclamation mark after install the adapter, please ask for SSD supplier to offer the NVME driver for SSD to PCIe )".  Searching the hardware got me to this and I found nothing helpful through google (originally tried driveridentifier).  "ID PCI\VEN_8086&DEV_F1A5&SUBSYS_390A8086&REV_03".  It's an intel product so it'd be helpful if someone could provide the appropriate drivers.  I have a windows 7 64-bit OS and yes I tried looking on this website, but every time I filter it to my exact match, I get nothing.  The ssd stick is the 256GB option, the stick shows a green light when my desktop is turned on as well.  It shows in my BIOS as an unknown device by intel, but does not appear in disk management.  If there's any other info needed to resolve this issue, I shall oblige.  Also, the driver assistant was no help either.  Thank you

        • 1. Re: intel ssd 600p series nvme driver
          Al Hill

          Look here under "How do I use the Intel® SSD 600p/Pro 6000p Series as a data drive?"

          Frequently Asked Questions for Intel® SSD 600p/Pro 6000p Series

           

          Also, this is likely not applicable to you:

          Download Client NVMe* Microsoft Windows* Drivers for Intel® SSDs

           

          Doc

          • 2. Re: intel ssd 600p series nvme driver
            N.Scott.Pearson

            Intel provides no NVMe driver for Windows 7. There is a back-port of the Microsoft NVMe driver that can be used; see the Microsoft sites for download (sorry, I don't have a link).

             

            To use NVMe support, you must have a BIOS that includes support for it and you must enable UEFI and install Windows 7 in UEFI mode. If your current Windows 7 install was done without UEFI enabled and/or was done in Legacy mode, then you will have to reinstall Windows 7 before you can "see" or access the drive.

             

            ...S

            • 3. Re: intel ssd 600p series nvme driver
              kcelestin

              Correct me if I'm wrong, but the simplest solution seems to just run an OS that's newer than windows 7?  In the post above I read through what I'd have to do to get it to work and the risks, but they didn't sound too inviting.  It sounds like having a newer OS would be an easier solution compared to what Microsoft page requires me to do.  I mean I wouldn't mind running windows 10, my laptop currently has it and it runs nicely, and certainly so much better than 8/8.1, which I hated.  What are your thoughts?  Also thank you very for the help.

              • 4. Re: intel ssd 600p series nvme driver
                Al Hill

                What processor(s) do you have?

                 

                Doc

                • 6. Re: intel ssd 600p series nvme driver
                  Al Hill

                  Then, you still have support for Windows 10!  Does My Intel® Processor Support Microsoft Windows® 10?

                   

                  As you said, install W10 and the problem is gone.

                   

                  Doc

                  • 7. Re: intel ssd 600p series nvme driver
                    kcelestin

                    I don't believe I mentioned that I'm on a hard disk drive currently and the ssd stick will be sitting in the pcie 3.0 slot.  The OS for my windows 7 ultimate is on the hard disk, of course. But I want the drivers to get the ssd stick to work so I can then partition then migrate my OS over to the ssd, along with other files (mostly games).  The ssd, when working, will be where I only keep the OS and games, while the hard disk drive will continue to hold my files for professional/school use and what not.  I see a lot of suggestions talk about clean installation of windows onto their ssd, but that's not exactly my situation.  Will upgrading to windows 10 still resolve the issue?  This crossed my mind as I looked through more forums and windows 10 reviews.  Sorry for dragging on this thread, but I appreciate the input.

                    • 8. Re: intel ssd 600p series nvme driver
                      Al Hill

                      I see a couple of ways to look at this.

                      From what you have said, you currently have your OS and data on the HDD.  And, you ultimately want to have the OS and games on the SSD, and use your HDD for files for professional/school work.

                       

                      1)  You could, with a W10 install stick, boot the stick, and upgrade the existing HDD from W7 to W10.  Then, when running W10 on the HDD, after updating the drivers and such, you should be able to see your SSD.  There is (or was) a SSD migration tool (a version of Acronis true image) that could be used to migrate the HDD to the SSD.  I do not know if that is still available.  If not, no problem, as you could use one of several tools available to clone the HDD to the SSD.  However, you could end up with both the SSD and HDD having the same signature.  So, you could use the tool to image the HDD to an external USB drive, then restore the Image to the SSD, select the proper boot order in your bios, boot the SSD, and then deal with deleting what you want from the SSD (your professional/school work), and then backup/copy your professional/school work, use diskpart to clean the hdd, use computer management/disk management to re-initialize the hdd, create whatever partitions you want on the hdd, and then restore your data backup to these partitions.

                       

                      I have done this type of shuffle game numerous times.  Currently, I use Macrium Reflect to do this, and it works quite well.  There are other tools as well.  The benefit to doing what I described above, is that an upgrade of W7 on the HDD to W10 on the HDD will keep many of your settings and installed software/apps.  It also carries the old baggage you had on the HDD over the years of updates and such.

                       

                      2)  The other solution is to use the USB W10 install media, do a clean install on the SSD (which will have nvme in box) , boot the ssd, and then move/install your games on the SSD, as well as any other software you had, and then do the cleanup of the HDD as I described above.  This also does NOT carry the old baggage over, which you may like.

                       

                      Whatever method you choose, it will take some time to do this.  Both solutions have benefits.  If you have all of the install media for your games, applications, office, etc, I would be inclined to use the second procedure.  If not, I would do the first procedure.

                       

                      Key to all of this is creating a good backup first, just in case...   Were it me doing this, and I were doing the first procedure, I would use macrium (home free), or some such tool.

                       

                      As I said, I have done #1 numerous times, and I have done #2 many times as well.  To me, the key is your games/software/app install media (and any keys needed).  Then, you need a usb stick for the W10 install media, an external usb drive to hold a backup, and a usb drive as an intermediary (could be the same USB drive), some quiet time, and a couple of hours.

                       

                      More questions?  Not a problem.  Keep asking and we will try to help.

                       

                      Doc

                      • 9. Re: intel ssd 600p series nvme driver
                        kcelestin

                        Yet another bloackade, I tried several things for hours and no luck.  While in legacy+uefi boot mode, "Drive 0 unallocated space" "Windows cannot be installed on this disk.  May not support booting to this disk".  Changed to just uefi boot, got to the installation screen where drive 0 is present, then installation process happens up until the end where it resets the pc for the first time.  According to diskpart, drive 0 has now become occupied with data, great right?  So I thought, then the computer rebooted as part of the install process, but the ssd even after getting windows 10 on it did not show up as a bootable device.  It's present to where it holds data, but not so much for booting up and finishing the installation process.  It's still an unknown device in the bios as well, reading from board explorer "pcie2 x16 : intel corp.. unknown device,, running at x4".  This next part is after some more research was done where I found that I had to preload the drivers during the installation process thanks to this https://www.intel.com/content/dam/support/us/en/documents/memory-and-storage/enthusiast-ssds/NVMe_Boot_Guide_332098-001U…  But now the question is which drivers am I suppose to preload? (I'll figure out the preloading process afterwards).  Whatever nvme drivers I've found, have not had my 600p series listed as a supported product. All I've found is this for search results Support for Intel® SSD 600p Series .  Now that I know I need to preload the drivers, I feel a bit relieved, but where are these drivers to be found?  I feel like I'm missing something.  Also this may be an important factor here, my bootable device is a dvd that I burned the .iso file to.

                        • 11. Re: intel ssd 600p series nvme driver
                          N.Scott.Pearson

                          Support for NVMe SSDs was typically not present in the BIOSs for the 8 Series boards that supported 4th generation Core processors. The 9 Series motherboards that also supported these processors typically only had this support if they also included an M.2 socket on the board. The only way that an NVMe card can be used in a system without NVMe support in the BIOS is if the PCIe adapter provides a OpROM that extends the BIOS with the necessary support. Does the adapter include such an OpROM? If it doesn't provide this BIOS extension, then what you are seeing (or not seeing, as the case may be) is exactly what I would expect to see happen.

                           

                          What specific adapter did you purchase? What specific motherboard do you have?

                           

                          ...S

                          • 12. Re: intel ssd 600p series nvme driver
                            kcelestin

                            I apologize for my miscommunication, these things are all results of what followed after I tried the clean install.  The W10 .iso file is on my 16gb USB, achi enabled, uefi only enabled and all of that.  The installation process proceeds as normal, like it says in the link you provided.  BUT, when restarting as part of the process, it brings me to the beginning of the process, since the ssd is still not being recognized as a bootable drive.  The only additional thing that's happened is that if I go to repair my computer, there's a button that says use another device, and I can select "unknown device" from that menu.  The computer then restarts and boots the w10 logo, then goes into the installation process once again.  Now what's viewable is no longer the single drive 0 unallocated space, 256gb.  It now shows several partitions created from the w10 installation process, via uefi usb 2.0.  The primary drive is the only one that can be selected for installation and says that all files will be sent to a folder labeled "old", and then the installation proceeds.  Once it restarts, this whole process go on from the beginning once more.  I hope this message is clearer than the last.  Now, I read through the manual and injecting the drivers seems to be the biggest thing.  So, a question I have is, even though that manual is written primarily for and referencing windows 7, should I be going along with method 2 rst/usb driver injection for win10, even though it shows this method to be for the win7 OS?  Or is that an issue?  I don't want to mess up my system or anything with wrong drivers and such.

                            • 13. Re: intel ssd 600p series nvme driver
                              N.Scott.Pearson

                              Your description tells me that I am likely correct, unfortunately.

                               

                              During the installation process, after loading the necessary files onto the target drive, the system is restarted. At this point, it is supposed to boot from the new Windows 10 installation on the drive but, in your case, the system is unable to boot from the new drive and, instead, it is again booting from the Windows 10 installation media. This is why you end up in an overinstall when you shouldn't.

                               

                              This has nothing to do with any driver(s) being missing. There are no driver missing; Windows 10 has NVMe drivers built in. What is missing is support in the motherboard's BIOS for booting from NVMe drives -- and there is no OpROM on the PCIe card providing the BIOS extension that is necessary to add this support.

                               

                              Again, to verify whether I am correct, I need more information (full part numbers) for the PCIe card and your motherboard.

                               

                              ...S

                              • 14. Re: intel ssd 600p series nvme driver
                                kcelestin

                                I am a-ok if the problem is the hardware, this is an ssd than my friend gave to me and told me I needed an adapter to make it work.  This custom built computer is several years old so I'm not surprised at all, just wanted to be sure I wasn't being dumb and missing something. https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0798PZ2LR/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o00_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1 this is the page for the adapter, I saw no mention of oprom on there. mobosnipforintelman.PNG

                                That's the info from system info utility, there's no doubt that you're correct since this pc is years old.  Thanks again to everyone for all the help.  I know dealing with people like me is no easy task, but I appreciate the patience.

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