3 Replies Latest reply on Apr 8, 2011 6:28 PM by spearson

    intel dg43nb ich and mch temperature rise when adding more hardware

    rabea_111

      hi to everyone , recently i had a  confusion regarding the temperature of the (MCH) and the (ICH) inside intel dg43nb , now i noticed  another issues related to the same case , i already installed a second HDD on my system (hitachi  500gb) and i had my old (segate 400gb) previously installed , i noticed  that the temperature of the ich increased till 85c  on normal load , but  if there is no load at all it will drop down to 81c , is that normal ?

      i  just want to add that my old hdd was connected (PATA) ,and the new hdd i added is connected (SATA)..

       

      please help , if you know anything related to  this problem...

       

      thanks to all those who helped before and those  who will ...

        • 1. Re: intel dg43nb ich and mch temperature rise when adding more hardware
          Boyet

          This is similar to your other thread which is marked as answered.

          • 2. Re: intel dg43nb ich and mch temperature rise when adding more hardware
            rabea_111

            hi, sorry for posting this twice ,but in other one i did not know how to change it , thats why i post it as new thread ..

            thanks..

            • 3. Re: intel dg43nb ich and mch temperature rise when adding more hardware
              spearson

              These temperatures are elevated, but not abnormal; SATA traffic will definitely raise the temperature of the ICH. The Tcontrol temperature for the 4 Series ICH is ~110 degrees (celsius) (and that for the MCH is something like ~97 degrees), so you still have plenty of headroom. When your system is idle, the temperature of the ICH should drop into the 60's. Your elevated temperature is likely the result of poor airflow. One possibility to look into is whether that PATA cable is blocking some of the airflow to the ICH...

               

              My personal recommendation would be to ensure that you have a really well-cooled chassis design. A well cooled chassis will have a processor fan, a chassis inlet fan (which is typically mounted in the front or on the side of the chassis and pulls (cooler) air into the chassis) and a chassis outlet fan (which is typically mounted on the rear of the chassis and pushes (hotter) air out of the chassis). I also recommend you choose a power supply which provides good airflow (i.e. pick one with 120mm fan(s), not one with 80mm fans). I personally use the Antec Three Hundred, which has space for two 120mm inlet fans in the front (and this air is blown over the hard drives in this design) and which comes with both rear (120mm) and top (140mm) outlet (exhaust) fans. Those included are standalone, fixed speed fans; I replaced them with fans that I could control using the motherboard's fan speed control capability, so airflow changes with heat detected by the motherboard. Same goes for the 120mm front fans; I gang-connected and control these with one header on the motherboard. Finally, for my high-end graphics card, I also put a 120mm fan on the side panel to blow air directly onto the graphics card (keeps those really horrible whiny fans that are on the graphics card at lower (i.e. quieter) speeds ;^)  )...