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    Intel Skull NUC 6I7KYK emits electric and magnetic fields

    ricus

      I've got the opportunity to test recently the Intel Skull NUC 6I7KYK, and these are the overall comments to the product and why I returned it back:

       

      • The performance is very good.
      • The Thunderbolt por 3 works perfectly, even supports the DisplayPort Alternate Support for Asus MB169C+.
      • It does not have room to allocate a 2.5" drive (the newer NUC7i7BNH will have it).
      • The worst part, and why I returned it back, is because both the power supply and the barebone itself emit high magnetic and electric fields, which I found very uncomfortable and cause head and chest pain depending on the position you put the barebone. The products should be shielded properly so no field get out (except the electromagnetic radiation for the WiFi and Bluetooth technologies, that you can disable on purpose).
      • The case in totally of plastic except the bottom, which is ferromagnetic metal. It creates a false sensation of a premium product.
      • The barebone is not earthed (the ground pin that goes to the barebone does not connect to the earth pin of the mains wall plug), so you get floating voltages. You have to use a USB cable to connect its negative to the earthing pins on the wall socket.
        • 1. Re: Intel Skull NUC 6I7KYK emits electric and magnetic fields
          MNBadger

          I'm sorry you were disappointed in the 6i7KYK however I would like to point out that the K versions are not intended to house a 2.5 inch drive as the various specifications point out. Furthermore all "bare" electronics boards emit electric and magnetic radiation including simple house wiring unless encased in conduit. As for floating board grounds, this is technically not an issue in most cases. In fact it can serve as safety advantage in that it will allow operation if the NUC board is connected to a piece of hardware which is incorrectly wired with a hot ground.

          • 2. Re: Intel Skull NUC 6I7KYK emits electric and magnetic fields
            ricus

            I can understand it on a development board but a finished product where you may be exposed 8 hours a day, it must be totally shielded.

            • 3. Re: Intel Skull NUC 6I7KYK emits electric and magnetic fields
              N.Scott.Pearson

              I usually ignore crap like this, but you go too far. Let's address your points one at a time:

               

              • Yes, that's true, it has plenty of performance. You won't see the same performance in the NUC7i7BNH; if you took the time to compare the specs for the processors, you would understand.
              • Yes, that's true too.
              • The priority of the design was given to supporting (a) two high-performance M.2 NVMe interfaces and (b) a low-profile chassis. If you want to have a large capacity 2.5" drive connected, there is plenty of performance in the USB 3.0 interface to connect one that way (comparable to having a direct SATA III interface).
              • No, it does not emit radiation as you describe; it *is* properly shielded. It could not be certified for sale in many countries if this was actually the case. It would not pass the UL or CSA certifications required for North American sales, for example (and it definitely does).
              • No, it is not simply a plastic chassis. Have you removed the plastic lid? There is a properly shielded and grounded metal lid underneath it. This *is* a premium quality build.
              • I don't know what you received, but my KY NUC came with a proper 3-prong power cable and thus it *is* a fully and properly grounded solution. If your country uses a plug without proper 3rd-pin grounding support, well, that's your country's problem, not the NUC's.

               

              ...S

              • 4. Re: Intel Skull NUC 6I7KYK emits electric and magnetic fields
                ricus

                N. Scott Pearson:

                Havint 3-prong power cable means nothing, you must check with a continuity tester that indeed it beeps (most multimeters have this function). Put one probe on the earth prong of the mains plug, and the other in the ground housing of say an USB or HDMI port, it must beep.

                 

                zqz3o.jpg

                 

                 

                The Gigabyte GB-BSi7HT-6500 also has 3-pin mains plug but it's not earthed either:

                 

                2le6yy0.jpg

                 

                About the electric and magnetic fields, specially the magnetic fields are high, and I've tested them with high quality 3-axis gaussmeter, where I have expertise, so you are refuting me nothing. For the most part, you are guessing, I won't spend my entire day explaining point by point why the things are, Intel knows what to do.

                • 5. Re: Intel Skull NUC 6I7KYK emits electric and magnetic fields
                  MNBadger

                  I'm sorry Ricus but I fail to see anything abnormal here. I too have the expertise and access to calibrated field probes. You have failed to provide any readings other than "high".

                  1) Is your probe calibrated and when?

                  2) What was the reading and how far away was the probe?

                  3) Were you in a shielded room away from other interference?

                  4) What ambient readings do you measure?

                  5) Did you disable the Bluetooth and WiFi transmitters?

                   

                  Facts will support a claim better than vague claims.

                  • 6. Re: Intel Skull NUC 6I7KYK emits electric and magnetic fields
                    jasonNUC

                    While Scott P. has done his usual thorough job of refuting what I can only call your silly claims, I'd still like to see some of your "evidence". Some of your claims are pure opinion, like "It creates a false sensation of a premium product". Others are blatantly false and/or ridiculous, like "the case in totally of plastic except the bottom, which is ferromagnetic metal" and "cause head and chest pain depending on the position you put the barebone" (seriously?).  Still others are nothing more than obvious statements, like "It does not have room to allocate a 2.5" drive" (as it was designed and advertised this way, your statement is like saying "this bicycle only has two wheels").

                     

                    You offer no evidence, details, or proof to back up any of your claims. The one about the NUC causing head and chest pain is especially problematic.  Making a claim like that without providing any supporting information rises to the level of libel.

                     

                    "I've tested them with high quality 3-axis gaussmeter, where I have expertise".  Fine, if you have the expertise you claim, I suggest you provide the results of your tests.

                    • 8. Re: Intel Skull NUC 6I7KYK emits electric and magnetic fields
                      ricus

                      I can't take pictures or videos anymore because I already returned the product, and I'm not going to buy it again.

                      Of course Wifi and bluetooth are off disabled by the BIOS, that is high frequency fields, I'm talking about electric and magnetic fields below 100 kHz.

                      Basically, it's very similar to this video, fields are extremely high on close distances: Top 10 Ways to Protect Yourself from EMF Radiation of Tablets & Laptop Computers - YouTube

                      I'm not member of any alternative fact movement stuff.

                       

                      When the newer barebones with Thunderbolt 3 (to run Asus MB169C+) and 2.5" drive support are out, like the Zotac MI572 or the Intel NUC NUC7i7BNH, I'll buy them and try to give much more detailed information. The HP Elite Slice i7-6700T looks good but lacks TB3 at least by official specifications. Zotac claims their barebones are properly shielded at least on one of the sides.

                      • 9. Re: Intel Skull NUC 6I7KYK emits electric and magnetic fields
                        Noxxle

                        The creator of that youtube video is this guy: The Art of Unity - The consciousness of uniting Body, Mind, & Spirit and in turn each other.

                         

                        Looks like pseudoscience to me.

                         

                        If anybody wants to know what's really going on here, watch season 2 of Better Call Saul.

                        • 10. Re: Intel Skull NUC 6I7KYK emits electric and magnetic fields
                          ricus

                          I see that nowadays top monitors are being sold as "Low Blue Light", or no PWM brightness. I didn't know that was harmful either, but now some manufacturers are taking it seriously.

                          • 11. Re: Intel Skull NUC 6I7KYK emits electric and magnetic fields
                            Al Hill

                            This is rapidly becoming one of my favourite threads.  I am waiting for test results using the space blanket from Jimmy's brother.<G>

                             

                            Doc

                            • 12. Re: Intel Skull NUC 6I7KYK emits electric and magnetic fields
                              jasonNUC

                              So this device is emitting dangerous levels of magnetic radiation, enough to cause you physical pain, and your response is to post about it in a support forum and NOT collect any data at all?

                              • 14. Re: Intel Skull NUC 6I7KYK emits electric and magnetic fields
                                Yozas2

                                What we have here is a classic example of why some people should not have access to a professional measuring equipment, because then you get a ton of incorrectly interpreted measurements and false assumptions. First of all, not all devices will make the multimeter "beep", because some do not have a low resistance connection between the power socket's GND terminal and device GND, and they don't have to. In fact it is not as simple as you think, therefore just having a low ohmic connection to GND terminal does not mean that it will provide a better suppresion of EMI fields, etc. Some will have like 100 ohm (multimeter will not beep at 100 ohm) or even higher, some will not have a DC conductive connection to GND at all. Are you even aware that a capacitor can ground the RF frequencies, and block your multimeter's DC test? Do you have any knowledge in RF design? In some cases it has to be done completely otherwise than someone with a rudimentary knowledge of electronics/RF design will expect, so don't just go out there bluntly looking for an 0 ohm connection between every device's GND terminal to device's casing and freak out when you don't find it.

                                 

                                About the plastic case, are you aware that most plastic cases (for example any plastic laptop) are covered with a thin layer of conductive metal film that is sprayed on the internal side of plastic?

                                 

                                Do you know that every device has to pass the strict certification to get the "OK" status and is tested before the production?

                                 

                                Actually I am not sure you had the EMI fields tester at all, and even if you did have, whether you were knowledgeable enough of how to use it properly...  Please do not waste peoples time

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