4 Replies Latest reply on Feb 15, 2017 9:22 AM by Intel Corporation

    Netwtw04 event log messages

    mcublert

      Using an the Intel Dual Band Wireless-AC 8260 network adapter, we are seeing drops of network connectivity. We are currently testing with the 19.30.10 driver to see if this resolves. In the meantime, I would like to take a look at the Netwtw04 event log messages that appear before the reset. All of the messages state that the descriptions for the events cannot be found ("Either the component that raises this event is not installed on your local computer or the installation is corrupted. You can install or repair the component on the local computer."). The events come with binary data that looks like it could contain helpful information. I have tried obtaining the Intel Wireless Event Viewer, but it doesn't get installed with the latest Intel Proset software. Is there a way to read this binary data?

        • 1. Re: Netwtw04 event log messages
          Intel Corporation
          This message was posted on behalf of Intel Corporation

          Hello mcublert,

          We understand you're having some connectivity issues which are creating some possibly relevant event viewer entries, and you would like some assistance interpreting the binary results provided. 

          As you're already aware, the Intel® Wireless Event Viewer is not compatible with newer versions of Windows*. The reason for this is that this application works hand in hand with the Intel® WiFi Connection Utility in order to start creating logs from the moment your adapter connects (or attempts to connect) to a wireless network. Unfortunately in Windows® 10 third-party applications are no longer allowed to manage network connections, which takes these helpful utilities out of the picture.

          It may also be important to highlight that the drivers provided through our download center are generic versions. It's not uncommon for each computer manufacturer (OEM) to modify the adapter and it's features, because of this the driver provided by them should always be your first choice, leaving our generic version as a secondary option. Each OEM should also be your primary resource for support. 

          If you continue to have issues, we could recommend a clean "driver only" installation, or modifying your system's power saving features pertaining to your wireless adapter.

          For a clean installation, you will need to take the following steps:

          1. Download the latest Intel® "IT Admin" Wireless Driver package for your adapter: https://downloadcenter.intel.com/download/26527.
          2. Extract this file to a known location, but don't install it just yet.
          3. Open the Control Panel > Programs and Features > Uninstall the "Intel® PROSet/Wireless Software." When prompted, choose the option to "Discard Settings."
          4. Now back to the Control Panel > Device Manager > Network Adapters > Right click on your Intel(R) Dual Band Wireless-AC 8260 and Uninstall it. Make sure to mark the option to "Delete the driver software for this device."
          5. Press the Windows* Key + R to open the Run box > Type "Cleanmgr.exe" and press OK. Select the main drive, usually "C:\" then check Temporary Files and uncheck everything else. Press OK.
          6. Reboot your PC.
          7. Open the Control Panel > Programs and Features > Locate your Intel(R) Dual Band Wireless-AC 8260 > Right click and "Update Driver Software" > Choose to "Browse my computer for driver software" > Select the folder where you extracted the PROSet back in step #2 and continue the installation. Reboot if prompted.

          After this (or before, if you choose not to reinstall your drivers yet), we'll like to make sure that your power settings aren't causing the disconnects:

          1. Open the Control Panel > Power Options > Change your plan to Maximum Performance (we can also apply the required settings to your current plan)
          2. Choose to "Change Plan Settings" > "Change advanced power settings"
          3. Extend your Wireless Adapter Settings > Power Saving Mode > Set both options to "Maximum Performance" > Press OK.

          Once this is all done, you may also apply our recommended wireless connectivity settings. Paying attention to make sure that your roaming setting is as low as your usage allows. While this article was created for 802.11n, it applies without change for 802.11ac adapters as well.

          If at the end and after some testing the issue persists, please let us know, as we may need to engage some of our additional resources in order to achieve a successful resolution.

          Best regards,
          Carlos A.

          • 2. Re: Netwtw04 event log messages
            Intel Corporation
            This message was posted on behalf of Intel Corporation

            Hello mcublert,

            We're following up on your thread since we have not heard back from you.

            Has your issue been resolved? Please let us know if you would like further assistance.

            Best regards,
            Carlos A.

            • 3. Re: Netwtw04 event log messages
              mcublert

              Thank you Carlos for the follow up. I am still in the process of testing the answer you have given.

               

              I would also like to point out that the answer I had asked still remains unanswered though. I will reiterate below.

               

              When viewing these events, the Windows event viewer also gives a binary output to the Raw Data section of the event. I would like to know if this can be read. The data seems to be structured. Do you have an API available to read this data? Can this data be read?

              • 4. Re: Netwtw04 event log messages
                Intel Corporation
                This message was posted on behalf of Intel Corporation

                Hello mcublert,

                While we do provide the Wireless Event Viewer for Windows* 7 to 8.1, this application creates it's own logs based on connectivity events and errors while it is active. It cannot be used to read a Windows* Event Viewer log file or it's binary data.

                Event Viewer logs are triggered and created based on activity directly related to our drivers and software, but they are created by your operating system, not by us. Event logs can be used to troubleshoot issues, since on the surface they can let us know what activities or services were run before a crash or error. But they are only looked into deeper by programmers and driver developers (and often in bulk, not individually, to search for error patterns). 

                If there is any software to read this data, it would be provided by Microsoft*, however we are not aware of any such application.

                For information on particular Event Viewer Error Codes, you can refer to the following Microsoft* links: 

                - Windows* Developer Center - System Error Codes.

                NOTE: Any links provided for third party tools or sites are offered for your convenience and should not be viewed as an endorsement by Intel® of the content, products, or services offered there. We do not offer support for any third party tool mentioned here.

                Best regards,
                Carlos A.