5 Replies Latest reply on Jan 20, 2017 6:17 AM by Intel Corporation

    NUC6i7KYK Memory Speed Question

    brudertl

      Hello,

       

      Maybe this is a silly question, but I'll ask anyway for my own education about memory.  After reading much in the forums, I see my model NUC only supports DDR4-2133 speed RAM.  In my system I'm running Crucial Ballistix DDR4-2400.  The bios reports it as 2400 and Windows 10 reports it at 2400.

       

      My system seems to run great.  If the NUC only supports 2133, what gives that my 2400 is working (and being reported) just fine?

       

      Crucial Ballistix Sport LT 16GB Kit (2 x 8GB) DDR4-2400 SODIMM | BLS2K8G4S240FSD | Crucial.com

      Specs: DDR4 PC4-19200 • CL=16 • Unbuffered • NON-ECC • DDR4-2400 • 1.2V • 1024Meg x 64

       

      //Brew

        • 1. Re: NUC6i7KYK Memory Speed Question
          Intel Corporation
          This message was posted on behalf of Intel Corporation

          Hi brudertl,

           

          I would like to share with you a very similar conversation I had on this same subject; https://communities.intel.com/thread/108512. I believe this conversation answers your inquiry, please check and of course if you have more questions in regard to this memory issue I will answer them.

           

          Regards,

          Amy.

          • 2. Re: NUC6i7KYK Memory Speed Question
            N.Scott.Pearson

            Troy,

             

            There is some good information (mine) in that other conversation, but, unfortunately, Amy is incorrect in one of her answers...

             

            First of all, when you install 2400MHz memory, the BIOS is going to try to run it at 2400MHz. No, it does NOT default to 2133MHz. Only if the memory fails to work at the SPD-specified speed (indicated by seeing POST error message), will it fall back to a 2133MHz default/recovery configuration and try to run with that.

             

            Intel designs for and warrants operation at 2133MHz. Any higher clock speed is considered overclocking and Intel officially does not support overclocking. Now, this does not mean that your system, with 2400MHz memory installed, is not going to work. In fact, in many cases, it will work just great. What is does mean, however, is that, if it doesn't work, Intel won't be held responsible.

             

            Here's the issue: If Intel does not specifically design for faster memory speeds, things could go awry. Worse, it could work perfectly for some period of time and then start failing. From a technical standpoint, the issue is noise. Many parts of the system generate noise that could affect the operation of the memory busses. The processor's memory controllers, the bus support circuitry, the DIMM sockets, the DIMMs themselves and the memory ICs on the DIMMs make up the set of components that most-directly contribute to the noise levels on the (two) memory buses (but other components - including some outside the chassis - can still affect it). For a particular board, with a particular DIMM or pair of DIMMs installed, the noise level on the busses will allow effective data transmission on the busses to some particular maximum (MHz) speed. Intel designs for and guarantees that this will be at least 2133MHz, but no higher. It is possible - and indeed likely - that operation at higher speeds will be ok. In fact, I have heard from one user who is using 3000MHz memory without issue.

             

            As I said, it could work perfectly at 2400MHz for some period of time and then start failing. Why? Well, as components age, additional noise can (and will) be generated. This means that, as time goes on, the maximum effectively-supported memory bus speeds will be slowly dropping. Intel guarantees that it will stay above 2133MHz over its entire warranted lifetime, but they do not warrant, for example, that it will stay above 2400MHz. Thus, after some period of time, this 2400MHz memory could appear to fail. Further, how well the overall solution works is also dependent upon the quality of the DIMMs being used. Unfortunately, I have seen 2133MHz DIMMs that don't work even at 2133MHz. For this reason, I stick to name brands and I stick to 2133MHz DIMMs.You get what you pay for.

             

            As I said in that other thread, using faster DIMMs does not necessarily result in a faster system. The amount of memory installed makes *significantly* more difference to the overall performance of the system than does the speed of the memory...

             

            I hope this explains it well enough...

            ...S

            • 3. Re: NUC6i7KYK Memory Speed Question
              Intel Corporation
              This message was posted on behalf of Intel Corporation

              N.Scott.Pearson thank you for the correction, now let's hope that this can help brudertl.

               

               

              Regards,

              Amy.

              • 4. Re: NUC6i7KYK Memory Speed Question
                brudertl

                Thank you both!  This is exactly what I was looking for.

                 

                //Brew

                • 5. Re: NUC6i7KYK Memory Speed Question
                  Intel Corporation
                  This message was posted on behalf of Intel Corporation

                  Brew, good to hear! 

                   

                  If you need further assistance let us know.

                   

                  Regards,

                  Amy.