2 Replies Latest reply on Jan 16, 2017 6:51 AM by MartyG

    Rectified Color Calibration Artefacts

    llschloesser

      I observe calibration artifacts in the rectified color video stream. I recently ran the latest RealSense calibration program and this had no observable effect on the rectified color stream, though it did tell me that the depth stream needed recalibrating, which I applied. It appears that that program does not affect the color stream, is that correct? Does Intel offer support for correcting the color image calibration? This seems like a necessity that may be missing.

       

      I am using the R200 camera.

       

      Fixing this is necessary for (accurately) performing tasks such as RGB-D visual odometry.

        • 1. Re: Rectified Color Calibration Artefacts
          Intel Corporation
          This message was posted on behalf of Intel Corporation

          Hi Llschloesser,

          Thank you for contacting us.

          I just want to let you know that unfortunately we do not have a solution for calibrating the RGB stream.

          But we really appreciate your post, and I'm gonna pass this information to the team in charge to consider it.

          Have a nice day.

          Regards,
          -Leonardo

          • 2. Re: Rectified Color Calibration Artefacts
            MartyG

            On a post on the old RealSense forum about this same problem on 5 Dec 2016, Intel staff Jesus L Garcia posted a link on the Intel website for a Camera Calibrator for the R200.

             

            Download Intel® RealSense™ Camera Calibrator for Windows*

             

            Edit: Llschloesser, re-reading your post, I see you had already used a calibrator.  Was it the above program?  If so, I apologize.

             

            Edit 2: Adjusting an RGB color stream with the RealSense camera is apparently possible but difficult.  A posting on the forum for the open-source RealSense SDK, Librealsense, stated: "Mapping depth to an unrectified RGB stream is possible, but requires building an interpolated inverse table".