10 Replies Latest reply on Nov 8, 2016 10:29 AM by N.Scott.Pearson

    battery pwr problem

    archn

      I have a Intel NUC D54250WYK that was being powered by an external battery thru a DC-to-DC converter.  It was using Windows 7 Ultimate.  It ran correctly.

       

      I upgraded to Windows 10 Pro, and now it no longer runs correctly.  I see NUC on the monitor, it goes through the bios, starts Windows, and then powers completely off.  I have adjusted the DC-to-DC converter to various output voltages, but the problem remains.

       

      When I disconnect from the battery and power from the standard AC converter there in no problem.

       

      My question: How does the NUC sense the difference between battery and AC power?

      And, what can I do about it?

        • 1. Re: battery pwr problem
          Intel Corporation
          This message was posted on behalf of Intel Corporation

          Hello archn:
           
          In regards to your inquiry, I just wanted to let you know that the support provided for the Intel NUCs is under stock configurations, any customization that you try on the NUC might or might not work, the NUC was tested by Intel using the parts that came with the product, that is why there is no documentation as to why it senses the difference between battery and AC power.
           
          According to the requirements on the NUC, the voltage needed to make it work properly goes from 12-19 V DC, based on this fact if your external battery can provide that voltage you could use it however we cannot guarantee that it will work for sure or damage your NUC since is not validated.
           
          The operating system normally is not related to the power, but in this case for testing purposes you can always go back to Windows® 7 or if you have the option to test the external battery on a different NUC or with a different device.
           
          Any questions, please let me know.
           
          Alberto
           

          • 2. Re: battery pwr problem
            archn

            Thanks Alberto for the quick reply.  I do have what I think is a pure NUC question at the end of this reply.

             

            Hopefully, some Windows 10 guru out there will send me some ideas.

             

            Unless I am doing something stupid it seems that a NUC running Windows 10 cannot be powered from an external battery.  I say 'running Windows 10' because it is not being shut down in the bios, it starts Windows 10.  This is weird.

             

            I know that batteries for laptops are complicated with internal intelligence.  Question: Is the AC adapter for a NUC just a rectifier (i.e., just converts AC to DC with a voltage stepdown) or does it also have some internal intelligence?

             

            Thanks, again.

            archn

            • 3. Re: battery pwr problem
              archn

              When being powered by the battery I can press F2 and enter the bios.   The NUC just stays in the bios until I press F10.   Then the NUC starts to boot Windows 10 Pro and stops. In other words, Windows 10 is clearly causing the problem.

              • 4. Re: battery pwr problem
                N.Scott.Pearson

                Are you taking into account the peak power requirements that occur when booting? That is, when set for 19V, is your battery capable of providing a full 3.43A (65W)?

                • 5. Re: battery pwr problem
                  archn

                  Scott thanks for the suggestion.

                  1.  The battery ran the NUC with Windows 7.

                  2.  The DC-to-DC converter is an Anyvolt 3 which yields 3 amps. It was being used with Windows 7.

                  3. I monitored the voltage during boot, and it was solid.

                  4. Yesterday I tried Safe Mode, and the NUC boots and runs until I stop it.  This suggests to me that there is something in the Start Menu that is very fussy.

                   

                  My simple-minded models of the battery power source and the standard AC adapter are that each has ideal voltage source and an internal impedance PERIOD.  If this is so, I cannot see how the NUC can tell the difference.  Apparently, my models are too simple minded.

                   

                  Thanks, again.

                  • 6. Re: battery pwr problem
                    N.Scott.Pearson

                    Well, it would appear to me that the full-speed startup of Windows 10 - and especially its full-speed initialization of all hardware - is more stressful than that of Windows 7 and requires the pull of more than the 3A that your DC-DC Converter can provide.

                     

                    Not sure what to suggest you do. Stick with Windows 7? Get a beefier DC-DC Converter?

                    ...S

                    • 7. Re: battery pwr problem
                      Intel Corporation
                      This message was posted on behalf of Intel Corporation

                      Hello:
                       
                      Thank you very much to N. Scott Pearson for the information provided above.
                       
                      To archn:
                       
                      In regard to your inquiry about the power adapter, yes, it is a rectifier and it does not have internal intelligence, on the following link you will find some details about it, page 52:
                       
                      http://www.intel.com/content/dam/support/us/en/documents/boardsandkits/D54250WYB_D34010WYB_TechProdSpec06.pdf
                      Since the problem happens when using Windows® 10, another option will be to get in contact with Microsoft directly, they might be able to provide further details on this matter:
                       
                      Microsoft’s phone number: 1 800-642-7676
                       
                      Microsoft’s support site: https://support.microsoft.com/en-us
                       
                      Any questions, please let me know.
                       
                      Alberto
                       

                      • 8. Re: battery pwr problem
                        archn

                        Scott,

                        The battery is inside a iRobot vacuum cleaner that is the base of a custom robot. So it, the battery, has enough power; however, its output voltage can go a bit over 21 volts, and I use the DC-to-DC converter to drop it down to about 19 volts.

                         

                        If it turns out that the DC-to-DC converter is indeed  too low power,  can I eliminate the DC-to-DC converter and connect the battery directly to the internal power connector of the NUC?  I know that it says that I can go as high as 24 volts on the internal connector, but is that really true?  I am assuming that I cannot go that high on the external power connector.

                         

                        Alberto,

                        Thanks for the info.  It allowed me to stop worrying about the AC adapter.

                         

                        Thanks, again, to both of you.

                        • 9. Re: battery pwr problem
                          Intel Corporation
                          This message was posted on behalf of Intel Corporation

                          Hello archn:
                           
                          You are welcome< we are glad to hear that you are not worry about the AC adapter anymore.
                           
                          Hopefully, you will be able to get the details you are looking for in regard to this type of connection from Scott or any other of the peers viewing this thread.
                           
                          Regards
                           
                          Alberto
                           

                          • 10. Re: battery pwr problem
                            N.Scott.Pearson

                            Well, I wouldn't recommend that you continuously run the unit with an unregulated input, but, since the TPS *does* say that 24V is acceptable, I would think that it should be ok to run without the regulator for a short test. If you find that this alleviates the problem and you can boot Windows 10 consistently, we will know what the issue is (well, was). My recommendation at that point would be to get a new DC-DC regulator that can output at better than 3.43A (65W).

                             

                            Hope this helps,

                            ...S