4 Replies Latest reply on Oct 7, 2016 9:24 AM by Intel Corporation

    RST does not see replacement drive after drive failure in RAID 1 volume

    ITHoser

      IBM / Lenovo ThinkStation P300  Machine type: 30AHCTO1WW


      -System details

       

      I have an I have an IBM / Lenovo ThinkStation P300  Machine type: 30AHCTO1WW equipped with Intel RAID technology.

      the machine is roughly three years old. It is as a remote location and I am unable to walk anyone through the process of getting the BIOS ROM version of the software/firmware so I can't report that info.

       

      The machine is running Windows V8.1 and had RST V12.8.0.1016 installed

       

      I built the machine and created the RAID 1 array initially via the BIOS  Ctrl-I interface

      Recently one drive failed ... and the machine would not boot.

      We unplugged the failed drive and then the machine booted normally.

      we replaced the dead drive with a very similar but not identical drive same series of Segate 2TB drive with same cyl/heads/sectors but different detail model number.

       

      I am at a remote location so after replacing the drive I had the on-site guy boot it up.

       

      It booted normally but when I went into RST  (V12.8.0.1016) it only "saw" the one good drive, it did not see the blank drive and thus was not rebuilding the array.

      In device manager under disks there were two entries:

           Intel RAID 1

           STxxxxxx  (the newly added drive)

       

      A reboot was of no help

       

      I upgraded RST to the latest version - V14.8.0.1042 and rebooted again... still RST did not see the newly added drive.

       

      I went into Disk Management and it showed the OS drive and the blank drive ....

      It prompted me to to create a partition style so I selected GUID which is the style of the existing drive ... I figured it couldn't hurt...

      I rebooted again and still RST did not "see" the newly added replacement drive.

       

      There is no one on site that is able to assist me by getting into the CTRL-I interface, so unless I can get some suggestions here I'm planning to drive out to the site and see if per chance the new drive needs to be added as a member disk or something like that ....

       

      BUT I WOULD HAVE THOUGHT I COULD DO THAT THROUGHT RST, AND I AM AT A LOSS TO EXPLAIN WHY THE DRIVE IS NOT DISPLAYED IN RST since device manager and the disk management utility both "see" it....

       

      Any suggestions appreciated!

       

      Thanks,

      Jim

       

       

       

        • 1. Re: RST does not see replacement drive after drive failure in RAID 1 volume
          ITHoser

          OK ...

          I am now on site ....

          I did not get the CTRL-I prompt on boot.

          Going into bios the drive config. is set to AHCI and NOT to RAID....

          If I change BIOS back to RAID from AHCI ... will the RAID s/w recognize that I have a degraded RAID 1 volume or will it start from scratch and wipe my data?

           

          I believe I'll be calling in on this.............   :-/

          • 2. Re: RST does not see replacement drive after drive failure in RAID 1 volume
            Intel Corporation
            This message was posted on behalf of Intel Corporation

            Hello ITHoser,
             
            Before getting any further, I strongly recommend doing a back up of your system to avoid losing any important data that you can need.
             
            Now, for the system to rebuild and for the raid to work as it should you need to set the driver configuration as raid in the BIOS.
             
            Once you do that, follow the steps at the following link to rebuild the system:
            http://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/support/boards-and-kits/000005775.html
             
            Most of the time when you replace a failed drive in a raid the rebuild will start automatically once you access Windows but if it does not do it follow the steps from the link above.
             
             
            Regards,
             
             
            Ivan
             

            • 3. Re: RST does not see replacement drive after drive failure in RAID 1 volume
              ITHoser

              Ivan ... thanks ... my problem turned out to be more complex....

               

              Somehow when the drive failed it appears the BIOS setting for drives reverted from RAID to AHCI ...

              I reset it to RAID

              This particular machine does not use the CTRL-I interface I am used to for configuring ARRAYs rather the RAID config. is buried in the advanced section of the "regular"  "F1" BIOS settings...

               

              After resetting the config to RAID I would have been able to create a RAID1 pair of drives from BIOS but it gave no indication as to whether it would mirror existing data to the new drive or create a "blank" RAID 1 array.

               

              So I booted back into the OS and used RST which did give me two options - create a new blank array or re-mirror using the data from the remaining good drive.

              I've kicked off that procedure and it is rebuilding the array.

               

              I'm still confused on two points:

              1) why the BIOS setting apparently changed its self from RAID --> AHCI

              2) why the machine would not boot on the remaining good drive from the array and required the dead drive to be unplugged before it would boot...

               

              but the customer is happy ... that's the important part   ;-)

              • 4. Re: RST does not see replacement drive after drive failure in RAID 1 volume
                Intel Corporation
                This message was posted on behalf of Intel Corporation

                Thank you for the information ITHoser and for taking your time to share it with us, I’m glad now that your issue has been resolved.

                Why the BIOS setting changes from RAID to AHCI it is strange, perhaps you will need to consult that with your motherboard manufacturer as they are more familiar with your motherboard BIOS.

                As you said, the customer is happy with the system now and that is the important part.


                Best wishes,

                Ivan

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