1 2 Previous Next 15 Replies Latest reply on Sep 5, 2016 11:26 AM by Intel Corporation

    How can I completely disable roaming on the Dual Band Wireless-AC 7260?

    some.name

      I'm having this pretty frustrating issue that can be summarized by the following ping test:

       

      Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=4ms TTL=64
      Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=1ms TTL=64
      Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=3ms TTL=64
      Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=1ms TTL=64
      Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=1ms TTL=64
      Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=3ms TTL=64
      Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=136ms TTL=64
      Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=45ms TTL=64
      Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=1ms TTL=64
      Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=217ms TTL=64
      Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=2ms TTL=64
      Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=64
      Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=2ms TTL=64
      Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=2ms TTL=64
      Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=64
      Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=3ms TTL=64
      Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=64
      Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=1ms TTL=64
      Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=2ms TTL=64
      Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=1ms TTL=64
      Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=64
      Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=1ms TTL=64
      Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=4ms TTL=64
      Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=2ms TTL=64
      Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=1ms TTL=64
      Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=1ms TTL=64
      Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=1ms TTL=64
      Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=4ms TTL=64
      Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=1ms TTL=64
      Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=64
      Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=64
      Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=1ms TTL=64
      Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=64
      Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=64
      Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=64
      Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=4ms TTL=64
      Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=1ms TTL=64
      Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=1ms TTL=64
      Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=2ms TTL=64
      Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=1ms TTL=64
      Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=1ms TTL=64
      Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=1ms TTL=64
      Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=1ms TTL=64
      Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=1ms TTL=64
      Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=64
      Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=1ms TTL=64
      Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=1ms TTL=64
      Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=1ms TTL=64
      Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=1ms TTL=64
      Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=1ms TTL=64
      Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=3ms TTL=64
      Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=1ms TTL=64
      Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=64
      Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=1ms TTL=64
      Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=1ms TTL=64
      Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=1ms TTL=64
      Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=2ms TTL=64
      Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=1ms TTL=64
      Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=1ms TTL=64
      Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=1ms TTL=64
      Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=64
      Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=1ms TTL=64
      Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=1ms TTL=64
      Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=1ms TTL=64
      Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=3ms TTL=64
      Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=64
      Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=64
      Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=64
      Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=1ms TTL=64
      Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=64
      Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=2ms TTL=64
      Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=2ms TTL=64
      Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=1ms TTL=64
      Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=1ms TTL=64
      Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=1ms TTL=64
      Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=178ms TTL=64
      Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=76ms TTL=64
      Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=17ms TTL=64
      Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=1ms TTL=64
      Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=64
      Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=2ms TTL=64
      Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=1ms TTL=64
      Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=64
      Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=1ms TTL=64
      Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=1ms TTL=64
      Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=2ms TTL=64
      Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=1ms TTL=64
      Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=2ms TTL=64
      Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=1ms TTL=64
      

       

      Every minute or so I get a huge lag spike. I first noticed it because I was playing a game (Overwatch) and lagging every minute. I did some research and there was a very similar issue on this thread:

       

      AC 7260 frequent ping spikes

       

      His solution didn't work for me though because the key he references in the registry doesn't exist. I'm using my own router in the ping test to eliminate any external issues. I have Linux, Android and OSX devices that can ping that router all day long without a hiccup, but the my Windows machine with the Dual Band Wireless-Ac 7260 has this issue. In fact, I can disable the card all together and use a cheap USB Wifi dongle to ping the router just fine.

       

      My reception is full as far as I can tell and I can max out my fiber connection at 100 down. The regularity of the lag spikes suggests that it's some automated process, which led me to believe the issue was roaming related. When I open the network list in Windows I can the same lag spike while pinging, which suggests to me that it might be the card scanning for wifi networks periodically. The issue: the options for the card (in the Windows dialog, Device Manager -> Intel AC 7260 -> Properties -> Advanced -> Roaming Aggressiveness) don't let me disable roaming, only set it to Lowest. I tried using the ProSet admin utility which appears to have an off option, but it didn't do anything.

       

      Finally, the question. How can I completely disable roaming on this card? Really, I'm trying to get rid of the periodic lag spikes, so if anyone has any suggestions to that end then I'm all ears.

       

      Message was edited by: Anthony Naddeo attached the SSU scan results

        • 1. Re: How can I completely disable roaming on the Dual Band Wireless-AC 7260?
          aleki_intel

          some.some,

           

          Roaming aggressiveness can not be disabled but, you can set it to lowest. This will make the adapter not to roam so often.

          Ping spikes can also be affected by other things. Could please let us know the following:

          1. the current driver version for the adapter.

          2. The Windows version currently installed.

          Please, use this tool to collect the logs and send to us so we can take a look: Download Intel® System Support Utility

           

          best regards,

          Aleki

          • 2. Re: How can I completely disable roaming on the Dual Band Wireless-AC 7260?
            some.name

            According to the device manager, I'm using version 18.33.3.2. I downloaded the most recent driver from the Intel site to get it, which was labeled as 19.1.0 and released on 7/25/2016.

             

            I'll attach the results of the support utility scan as soon as I find the attach button (help welcome)

            • 3. Re: How can I completely disable roaming on the Dual Band Wireless-AC 7260?
              aleki_intel

              some.some,

               

              We will be more than glad to help you. Here is how you can do to attach a file.

               

              1. Click on "Reply". Once you have clicked on it, you will notice that to the right upper corner there is an option that says "Use advanced editor", please click on it.

              2. Once you clicked on that option, you will notice that right below, on the right lower corner, you will see the option that says "Attach" and there you go.

               

              Please, should this method not work, let us know immediately so we can explore other ways to send it to us.

               

              Best regards,

              Aleki

              • 4. Re: How can I completely disable roaming on the Dual Band Wireless-AC 7260?
                some.name

                I managed to attach it yesterday on the original message. Can you take a look?

                • 5. Re: How can I completely disable roaming on the Dual Band Wireless-AC 7260?
                  aleki_intel

                  some.some,

                   

                  Thank you very much. We are going to take a look and will get back to you very soon. Please, in the mean time, let us know if you have any further questions.

                   

                  Best regards,

                  Aleki

                  • 6. Re: How can I completely disable roaming on the Dual Band Wireless-AC 7260?
                    Intel Corporation
                    This message was posted on behalf of Intel Corporation

                    some.some,

                     

                    According to the information provided through the logs, all seems to be in order. The ability of the adapter to constant search for a network has little to none impact when playing games. In order to help you further, here are some tips that might help you to resolve this situation.

                     

                    1. Select game servers closer to you. Many games have the option to either browse through available servers or set your matchmaking region. Selecting a location close to you is the absolute most effective way to decrease your ping. The process for this will vary wildly depending on the game you are playing.

                     

                    Look for location filters in your server browser, locations in the server name or description,  (example: US-West, EU, etc.), or region settings in the matchmaking menu.
                    Not all multiplayer games allow you to select a region, and may automatically try to connect you to the closest server or player to you.

                     

                    2. Close any network-hogging programs on your computer. Before playing your online game, make sure any bandwidth-chugging programs are closed. Torrents, streaming music, and open browsers can all have a big impact on your in-game lag. Close these programs before starting your game. Look in the System Tray for programs that may be running in the background.

                     

                    3. Check if there are any other devices on your network taking bandwidth. If someone is streaming video in the other room, you'll likely take a big hit to your ping. Try to time your gaming to when others aren't using the network, or ask politely if they can do something else for a while.

                     

                    4. Connect your computer or game console to your router via Ethernet. If your computer or video game console is connected to your network wirelessly, you may experience a decrease in performance in-game. If your network setup allows it, try to run an Ethernet cable from your computer's Ethernet port to an open LAN port on your router and test the game again. You may need to select the wired connection if you are already connected wirelessly.

                     

                    5. Reset your network hardware. If you're noticing worse lag than usual, resetting your network hardware may solve the problem. This will disable your network for a short while, so close your game first and make sure you're not interrupting anyone else:
                    Remove the power cable from your modem and from your router, if you have a separate one.
                    Let your network hardware rest unplugged for about 30 seconds then plug your modem back in and wait for it to boot up. This could take a minute or two. Plug your router back in after the modem finishes turning on. The router may take an additional minute or two to turn back on.

                     

                    6. Check for malware on your computer. If you have a virus or adware infection, background processes may be eating up a lot of your bandwidth and processing power. Make sure your antivirus program is up to date, and run scans with Malwarebytes Anti-Malware and AdwCleaner (both free) to find and remove most common infections.

                     

                    7. Enable QoS on your router (if possible). If you have a router that supports QoS (Quality of Service) controls, you can use them to prioritize gaming traffic on your network. The process for activating these controls vary depending on your router, and not all routers have this feature.
                    Most QoS default settings will prioritize gaming and web browsing over other traffic. You may need to look up specific settings for your router.

                     

                    8. Upgrade your router if you haven't in a while. When connected wirelessly and you haven't upgraded your router in a few years, you may be able to get a much more stable connection with a firmware update.

                     

                    9. Update your graphics card drivers. Your graphics card drivers are the software that controls your graphics card and allows it to interface with games. Running outdated drivers can have a big impact on your performance, as drivers are often tweaked in later releases for specific games. Try to make sure you're always running the latest version of your drivers. You can download the latest drivers from the Nvidia* support website.

                     

                    10. Lower your in-game settings. The best way to get a big performance boost from your games is by lowering the graphical settings. This may make the game look a little worse, but can lead to massive gains in frames per second (FPS), which will provide a much smoother experience. Look for some of the following settings in your game's Graphic Options menu for a big impact:
                    Resolution - Games will look best when they're running at your monitor's native resolution, but you can make a big FPS improvement by dropping the resolution down. The game will look blocker, but should instantly feel smoother. Changing your resolution can give you one of the biggest performance boosts you can get. For example, switching from 1920×1080 to 1600×900 will often give you about a 20% boost in FPS.
                    Anti-aliasing (AA) - This is the technique that smooths out the pixelated edges on objects, making edges look more natural. There are lots of different AA options (MSAA, FSAA, etc.), but for now you just need to know that most of them have a big performance cost. Try turning AA off completely and see how your game plays. If you're getting super-smooth performance and want to try some AA, try FXAA if available first, as this is the cheapest AA solution. Also, stick to 2X or 4X solutions.
                    Texture Quality - If you're getting intermittent stuttering while playing (as opposed to a low frame rate), you may want to lower your texture quality. This is especially important when playing newer video games with older video cards.
                    Shadow Quality - Detailed shadows can take a whole lot of processing power, so try dropping your shadow quality to get a major performance boost.
                    V-Sync - This locks the vertical sync to your monitor’s refresh rate which may force the game to run at a lower frame rate. You can disable this setting for a potential speed boost, however it may introduce screen tearing.

                     

                    11. Run a version optimized for your hardware or drivers. A game may come with an alternative version of the game that is optimized for 32-bit or 64-bit CPU processors or may come with a version that is optimized for your graphics driver such as Direct X 11 or above. Run the different executables and note which one provides better performance.
                    There are two major graphics card manufacturers on the market, Nvidia and AMD. You may run into a game that was designed around one particular graphics card. The developer may provide a patch that resolves issues with a graphics card brand that is known to cause performance issues.

                    We hope these tips may help you to resolve this situation. Let us know if they helped you.

                     

                    Best regards,

                     

                    Aleki

                    • 7. Re: How can I completely disable roaming on the Dual Band Wireless-AC 7260?
                      some.name

                      Why do you say that it has little to no impact on games? I can confirm that it does have an impact on games like Overwatch that are sensitive to lag spikes.

                       

                      It is very easy to reproduce as well. Just open up Overwatch, manually trigger a network scan in windows by clicking on the networking icon, observe a spike in ping time while simultaneously observing a spike in in-game latency, which is visible as erratic and laggy character movement.

                       

                      I'm not sure why you would have said that. Clearly I'm here because that is the issue. Also, the fact that replacing the intel card with any $20 usb 2.4ghz card solves the issue that does not scan regularly should be a hint as well.

                      • 8. Re: How can I completely disable roaming on the Dual Band Wireless-AC 7260?
                        Intel Corporation
                        This message was posted on behalf of Intel Corporation

                        some.some,

                        Could you please be so kind and try the tips provided while we investigate further on this regarding this adapter? Let us know the results as soon as possible.

                        Best regards,
                        Aleki

                         

                        • 9. Re: How can I completely disable roaming on the Dual Band Wireless-AC 7260?
                          some.name

                          I put responses to each suggestion below. I  tried them all, they don't help. Its also pretty frustrating to have you make me do this when clearly some of the suggestions don't apply.

                          1. Select game servers closer to you.

                              Can't be done, Overwatch doesn't allow for server selection

                           

                           

                          2. Close any network-hogging programs on your computer. Before playing your online game, make sure any bandwidth-chugging programs are closed. Torrents, streaming music, and open browsers can all have a big impact on your in-game lag. Close these programs before starting your game. Look in the System Tray for programs that may be running in the background.

                              Done, nothing is on the computer besides overwatch and my browser, and I've closed every I could that comes with Windows. Did not help.

                           

                           

                          3. Check if there are any other devices on your network taking bandwidth. If someone is streaming video in the other room, you'll likely take a big hit to your ping. Try to time your gaming to when others aren't using the network, or ask politely if they can do something else for a while.

                              All of my tests have been around 2am. I've verified that nothing else was taking up bandwidth. Bandwidth isn't even the issue, ping is.

                           

                           

                          4. Connect your computer or game console to your router via Ethernet. If your computer or video game console is connected to your network wirelessly, you may experience a decrease in performance in-game. If your network setup allows it, try to run an Ethernet cable from your computer's Ethernet port to an open LAN port on your router and test the game again. You may need to select the wired connection if you are already connected wirelessly.

                              We're debugging a wireless card.

                           

                           

                          5. Reset your network hardware. If you're noticing worse lag than usual, resetting your network hardware may solve the problem. This will disable your network for a short while, so close your game first and make sure you're not interrupting anyone else:

                          Remove the power cable from your modem and from your router, if you have a separate one.

                          Let your network hardware rest unplugged for about 30 seconds then plug your modem back in and wait for it to boot up. This could take a minute or two. Plug your router back in after the modem finishes turning on. The router may take an additional minute or two to turn back on.

                              Multiple resets so far. Did not help

                           

                           

                          6. Check for malware on your computer. If you have a virus or adware infection, background processes may be eating up a lot of your bandwidth and processing power. Make sure your antivirus program is up to date, and run scans with Malwarebytes Anti-Malware and AdwCleaner (both free) to find and remove most common infections.

                              Brand new install, no malware.

                           

                           

                          7. Enable QoS on your router (if possible). If you have a router that supports QoS (Quality of Service) controls, you can use them to prioritize gaming traffic on your network. The process for activating these controls vary depending on your router, and not all routers have this feature.

                          Most QoS default settings will prioritize gaming and web browsing over other traffic. You may need to look up specific settings for your router.

                          QoS was already enabled and it doesn't help.

                           

                           

                          8. Upgrade your router if you haven't in a while. When connected wirelessly and you haven't upgraded your router in a few years, you may be able to get a much more stable connection with a firmware update.

                              Router is up to date (and less than one year old).

                           

                           

                          9. Update your graphics card drivers. Your graphics card drivers are the software that controls your graphics card and allows it to interface with games. Running outdated drivers can have a big impact on your performance, as drivers are often tweaked in later releases for specific games. Try to make sure you're always running the latest version of your drivers. You can download the latest drivers from the Nvidia* support website.

                              Graphics drivers are up to date.

                           

                           

                          10. Lower your in-game settings. The best way to get a big performance boost from your games is by lowering the graphical settings. This may make the game look a little worse, but can lead to massive gains in frames per second (FPS), which will provide a much smoother experience. Look for some of the following settings in your game's Graphic Options menu for a big impact:

                          Resolution - Games will look best when they're running at your monitor's native resolution, but you can make a big FPS improvement by dropping the resolution down. The game will look blocker, but should instantly feel smoother. Changing your resolution can give you one of the biggest performance boosts you can get. For example, switching from 1920×1080 to 1600×900 will often give you about a 20% boost in FPS.

                          Anti-aliasing (AA) - This is the technique that smooths out the pixelated edges on objects, making edges look more natural. There are lots of different AA options (MSAA, FSAA, etc.), but for now you just need to know that most of them have a big performance cost. Try turning AA off completely and see how your game plays. If you're getting super-smooth performance and want to try some AA, try FXAA if available first, as this is the cheapest AA solution. Also, stick to 2X or 4X solutions.

                          Texture Quality - If you're getting intermittent stuttering while playing (as opposed to a low frame rate), you may want to lower your texture quality. This is especially important when playing newer video games with older video cards.

                          Shadow Quality - Detailed shadows can take a whole lot of processing power, so try dropping your shadow quality to get a major performance boost.

                          V-Sync - This locks the vertical sync to your monitor’s refresh rate which may force the game to run at a lower frame rate. You can disable this setting for a potential speed boost, however it may introduce screen tearing.

                           

                           

                              Lowering settings did not help.

                           

                           

                          11. Run a version optimized for your hardware or drivers. A game may come with an alternative version of the game that is optimized for 32-bit or 64-bit CPU processors or may come with a version that is optimized for your graphics driver such as Direct X 11 or above. Run the different executables and note which one provides better performance.

                          There are two major graphics card manufacturers on the market, Nvidia and AMD. You may run into a game that was designed around one particular graphics card. The developer may provide a patch that resolves issues with a graphics card brand that is known to cause performance issues.

                          We hope these tips may help you to resolve this situation. Let us know if they helped you.

                              There is no alternate version of the game

                          • 10. Re: How can I completely disable roaming on the Dual Band Wireless-AC 7260?
                            Intel Corporation
                            This message was posted on behalf of Intel Corporation

                            some.name,

                             

                            Thank you for the time take to try the suggestions. In this case, could you please try the following:

                             

                            1. Disable location services: Using your admin account, go to Start Menu >> Settings >> click on Privacy and go to Location.

                             

                            2. Disable Wi-Fi Sense: Got to Settings and then click on Network and Internet and scroll down to find Wi-Fi Setting and click on it to open the the following panel:

                            Besides turning it off, you want to uncheck the 3 other available options if not needed.

                             


                            3. Disable Bluetooth* as Wi-Fi* and Bluetooth* uses the same antennas.

                            4. Disable Peer-to-Peer (P2P), here is how you can do it: Go to Start Menu and select settings then click on Updates & Security

                            5. Please, make sure Windows Update is selected in the left-hand navigation pane (it’s the default when you open Updates & Security) and then click Advanced Options in the main pane.

                            6. You’ll see a other options and check boxes. Choose how updates are delivered.

                             

                            7. By clicking on this option, you will be led to the page with the options that legislate how Windows 10 handles P2P updates. By default, Windows 10 will both send and receive updates from devices on your network and the Internet at large.

                            It’s the last option that’s the potential data cap destroyer. Using the options on this page, you can opt to only allow P2P updates among machines on your local network, or disable them completely.

                             

                            Alternatively, you can also perform the following as this has been reported by other users to resolve the ping issue.

                             

                            1) Right click your wireless Icon, bottom left of Windows* task-bar.

                            2) Select "Open Network and Sharing Center"

                            3) Select "Change adapter settings", found on the left

                            4) Right click your wireless connection and select "Properties" (ensure you are doing this on the wireless card and not Ethernet or a different wireless adapter if you have more than one)

                            5) Select "Configure"

                            6) Select the "Advanced" tab and change these settings from the default to the ones indicated below

                            - 802.11n channel Width for 2.4GHz connections to 20MHz ONLY (Default is Auto)

                            - Preferred Band 2.4GHz (Default is Auto)

                            - Roaming Aggressiveness 1. Lowest (Default is 3. Medium)

                            - Wireless mode 802.11b/g (Defualt is 802.11a/b/g)

                             

                            The first and last steps are MOST IMPORTANT. The first step, changing connections to 20MHz only as this forces the antenna to penetrate through walls. The last may impact positively on ping spikes issue. Windows®10 may cause the connection to the router to use the 802.11a standard which is slower and less reliable. Setting wireless mode to just b/g forces the card to only connect using the faster speeds. Setting it to just 'g' ensures the very fastest speed available on 2.4Ghz routers with this card, however this will limit the compatibility when connecting to other routers that may be older. Either 'b/g' or just 'g' may help eliminating pink spikes. Please, choose 'b/g' however, just 'g' seems resolve this situation.

                            Finally, to eliminate any issues from Windows 10 itself, make sure to disable P2P updates in your Wi-Fi settings.

                             

                            Please, let us know if this helped you.

                             

                            Best regards,

                            Aleki

                            • 11. Re: How can I completely disable roaming on the Dual Band Wireless-AC 7260?
                              some.name

                              1. Location services was never on

                               

                              2. I have no WIFi sense option available in my settings menu.

                               

                              3. I don't even have the wifi module plugged into the motherboard on this card so I don't have any bluetooth settings

                               

                              4. Done, see below

                               

                              Ok, looks like the channel width has no impact on performance, but the wireless mode definitely does. In a/b/g mode I get the most severe spikes. I tried a bunch below. The biggest spike is listed below for each mode.

                               

                              a/b/g: 180ms (scanning for both 2.4 and 5ghz networks)

                              b/g: 77ms (scanning for only 2.4ghz networks)

                              a/g: 196ms (scanning for only 5ghz networks)

                              g: 170ms (scanning for only 2.4ghz networks)

                              b: 6ms (scanning for only 2.4ghz networks)

                              a: 209ms (scanning only for 5ghz networks)

                               

                              So, it seems reasonable to suspect that something about using a and/or g is causing the issue, because when I set it to solely use b the lag spikes are almost entirely gone (occasionally 20ms, but that is tolerable). I also noticed that I'm usually <1ms when I'm not spiking on b/g, but on a I'm never <1ms, but its still good enough. Ping test below for the b wireless mode test.

                               

                              Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=2ms TTL=64
                              Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=2ms TTL=64
                              Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=1ms TTL=64
                              Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=19ms TTL=64
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                              Ok so, now that we know that, onto the next problem. Why is this happening and how do we stop it? If I wanted a 2.4ghz card then I would have just gotten one. Now I have this fancy intel card that I can't use for gaming on 5ghz, so it seems like I should just return it and get a cheaper one.

                              • 12. Re: How can I completely disable roaming on the Dual Band Wireless-AC 7260?
                                Intel Corporation
                                This message was posted on behalf of Intel Corporation

                                some.name,

                                Could you please confirm if you have used the recommendation found in this link? Recommended Settings for 802.11n Connectivity we also need the information provided by Intel® System Support Utility For this piece of information, it is important the you make sure you're computer is connected to the internet. Please, provide full information on the router including the firmware version.

                                Best regards,
                                Aleki

                                 

                                • 13. Re: How can I completely disable roaming on the Dual Band Wireless-AC 7260?
                                  some.name

                                  I've tried the settings they recommend. They didn't solve anything for me and I was able to observe the ping spikes while I had them. Also, I've already run the Intel SSU and attached it in my original post.

                                  • 14. Re: How can I completely disable roaming on the Dual Band Wireless-AC 7260?
                                    Intel Corporation
                                    This message was posted on behalf of Intel Corporation

                                    some.name,

                                    We do understand you have provided the logs in the original post but it is important that you provide  us a new one with your computer connected to the Internet.

                                    Best regards,

                                    Aleki

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