4 Replies Latest reply on Aug 23, 2016 1:43 PM by Intel Corporation

    putting a 100 mm fan on top of NUC case instead of original top?

    Mertzi

      And also removing the original fan but not the heatsink. Do you think this will work? I've been thinking of buying a passive case from Akasa but then I thought about this idea. I don't like the high frequent sound a small fan makes when it spins fast, but a larger fan has a much more pleasant sound even at higher RPM values.

       

      I still don't have an idea for how to use the power button though, but I rarely power off my NUC.

        • 1. Re: putting a 100 mm fan on top of NUC case instead of original top?
          TechnoCaveman

          Hi,


             I know what you mean about fan sounds. Not knowing how you will modify the NUC, my knee jerk reaction is electromagnetic or RF emissions issues. The ports of the NUC have silver cloth to prevent emissions.

            Will the fan run full tilt most of the time or can you tap into the different power settings to make it variable speed ?

           

            Which NUC ? They have different power and cooling needs.

           

          Allen

          • 2. Re: putting a 100 mm fan on top of NUC case instead of original top?
            Intel Corporation
            This message was posted by Intel Corporation on behalf of

            Hello, All:

             

             You may want to consider that adding this configuration might affect the air flow inside the chassis. We haven't tried this configuration from our end, we recommend using the NUC from its factory form that way we can assure the high quality and performance of the product. However, I would like to encourage the community here to collaborate in regard to this matter, if you have any tip on configuration please join the thread.

             

            TechnoCaveman, thank you for your input.

             

            Regards,

            Amy.

            • 3. Re: putting a 100 mm fan on top of NUC case instead of original top?
              TechnoCaveman

              Amy,

               

                  People have said they want the NUC small, others do not mind making it a bit larger.

               

                  Mertzi and I both do not mind a larger fan for high CPU and SSD performance.  I would like to see a larger quiet fan blowing air into where the current fan sits. Why?

                  1) Blow air from outside the case out the back across the CPU cooling fins. Currently outside the case air is warmed by passing over and cooling the SSD, memory and other components.

                  2) Blow additional air (higher CFM) from the ram toward the SSD drive. Why? Some SSD like the Samsung 950 have thermal control. Hence cooler is better.

                 In short, air enters the case from the power button side and exits from both the back and the side. This also allows access to blow compressed air across the cooling fins without going into the fan. Sorry my home can not afford a DataAire and raised floor system like they have at work.

               

                 Amy - a question for you. Does the NUC's mounting orientation affect cooling? There seems to be a cooling loop between the CPU and the cooling fins. Should the NUC be mounted front side facing down? 

               

              Allen

              • 4. Re: putting a 100 mm fan on top of NUC case instead of original top?
                Intel Corporation
                This message was posted by Intel Corporation on behalf of

                Does the NUC's mounting orientation affect cooling?

                 I do not believe that it will affect the cooling as long as the air vents from the chassis are not covered or blocked.

                 

                Should the NUC be mounted front side facing down? 

                If you are using the VESA mount, there will be no problem with the NUC orientation. Otherwise, just make sure that air vents from the chassis are not covered or blocked.

                 

                Regards,

                Amy.