8 Replies Latest reply on Feb 8, 2016 7:41 AM by DiegoV_Intel

    Intel Edison Problems

    tharri29

      So i have Intel Edison and a Arduino Uno, when i use the Arduino Uno i can get the pin 13 to blink no problem but for some reason i cant get the Intel Edison with the break out board to produce enough voltage to power the led.  I've been scouring  the internet the last two days to see if i need to set anything with the Intel Edison board but it has limited support. just trying to figure out if this thing is DOA or do i just not know what i'm doing.

       

      i have a 3.3 and 5V LED and neither one works. i was reading somewhere that the Edison uses 1.8V for logic but i was positive that they were talking about the mini Edison board.

       

      BTW when i do the blink on pin 13 from the Arduino IDE the on board led blinks just fine. Just does not seem to be a voltage on the pins. ive also tried on a variety of the pins and yielding no success, is all the pins on the digital out broken?

        • 1. Re: Intel Edison Problems
          DiegoV_Intel

          Hi tharri29,

           

          As you said, the Edison module uses 1.8V logic; however the Arduino Expansion Board has voltage converters to make the board 3.3V/5V compatible. You should get 5V from the digital pins when setting them HIGH.

           

          I'm thinking that maybe the IOREF jumper is not placed correctly. Check the following document to know where the IOREF jumper is located and how it should be placed: Intel® Edison kit for Arduino – Jumper Headers

           

          Additionally, do you have any way to measure the voltage in each digital pin, using a multimeter for example?

           

          Regards,

          Diego

          • 2. Re: Intel Edison Problems
            Vincenze

            The pins of the Atmega328 microprocessor, which is the core of the Arduino Uno, can directly drive LEDs as they can provide 40mA.

             

            The digital outputs of the Edison and the Edison Arduino are weak. You should use a transistor to provide higher current to an LED.

            Check the schematic for the Edison Arduino board, the part for the GPIO13.

            The pin DIG13_1P8 drives the LED DS2 via the transistor Q9 BSS138.

             

            It seems that the level converter 74LVC1T45, which buffers the digital pins, can provide 24mA at 3.3V and 32mA at 5V. It should be enough for powering LEDs.

            Do you use a resistor to limit the current through the LED?

            Can you output 1 and check the voltage? Then output 0 and check the voltage.

            • 3. Re: Intel Edison Problems
              tharri29

              ok so how do you set the ioref pin? I'm new to this but dont want to kill the board if i mess something up. everywhere i read they say set the pins but no ones shows how. also thanks Vincenze ill try that but i want to make sure this board is not defective. some where is says it has the a level shifter on board so why would i need to do the transistor thing. excuse me if the question sound  a little stupid im still in the process of learning

              .

              • 4. Re: Intel Edison Problems
                Vincenze

                Voltage is not everything for powering an LED.

                An LED may consume a lot of current, and a chip may not provide enough. You also need a resistor to limit the current through an LED. Otherwise, you can short-circuit a digital pin through an LED and burn it.

                Get a multimeter and check if the voltage on a pin changes.

                • 5. Re: Intel Edison Problems
                  DiegoV_Intel

                  Hi tharri29,

                   

                  The IOREF pin is set by a jumper. The description is in the document I linked in my post above. You only have to check if the jumper is in the correct place to make the IO compatible with 5V logic.

                   

                  On the other hand, were you able to measure the voltage in each digital pin? Try uploading a sketch that sets all digital IOs to HIGH and then measure that effectively there is 5V in each one.

                   

                  Regards,

                  Diego

                  • 6. Re: Intel Edison Problems
                    CMata_Intel

                    Hi tharri29,

                     

                    Have you been able to work on this?

                    Did you check the IOREF pin?

                     

                    Regards,

                    Charlie

                    • 7. Re: Intel Edison Problems
                      tharri29

                      i'm still trying to figure it out but i think it might be DOA. i should have my multimeter in a couple days to check it out.

                       

                      BTW thanks everyone for the help

                      • 8. Re: Intel Edison Problems
                        DiegoV_Intel

                        Hi tharri29,

                         

                        If you consider the board is DOA, and you purchased the board recently, I recommend you to contact the place of purchase to claim warranty. On the other hand, if you purchased the board a time ago you could submit a warranty ticket using the following form: Intel Support

                         

                        However, try first to make the tests with the multimeter once you have it.

                         

                        Regards,

                        Diego