Precision medicine is gaining traction worldwide. Countries like China, the UK and Saudi Arabia are all committing to enabling precision medicine to improve the health of their people. In the US, I have been honored to learn from, and serve on, the NIH advisory group for the President’s Precision Medicine Initiative (PMI). Recently, Intel made corporate commitments to help accelerate the PMI effort.  We’ve launched an industry challenge called “All in One Day” to make an individual’s precision treatment possible, easy, and affordable within 24 hours from genome sequence to customized care plan.

 

As I and my team travel around the world to drive this initiative, we are hearing a common refrain around the need for robust and secure ways to share data so we can accelerate the scientific breakthroughs and insights for precision medicine.  It is increasingly clear that secure data sharing—at a scale far beyond what today’s efforts have achieved so far—is a fundamental barrier we must overcome to scale precision medicine for all. Vice President Biden’s “cancer moonshot” effort, for example, is focusing on this crucial data sharing challenge.

 

To that end, we announced our work with OHSU on the Collaborative Cancer Cloud in August. Earlier today, Intel and OHSU were pleased to announce the expansion of the Collaborative Cancer Cloud to include Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Ontario Institute for Cancer Research. I am excited to welcome them as fellow pioneers in collaborating on this personalized medicine platform.

Cancer research and institutions doing the research, benefit greatly when the size of the datasets are maximized. By participating in the Collaborative Cancer Cloud, the institutions increase the chances of making new discoveries and finding potential life-saving insights through collaborative analytics across patient datasets the institutions have collectively assembled.

 

The Collaborative Cancer Cloud is unique because it uses a federated approach, meaning the institutions don’t need to upload their data in a centralized location in order to share or run analytics on larger datasets. This approach overcomes many of the concerns around collaborating on sensitive datasets while having access to unprecedented volumes of data. This allows for secure, aggregated computation across distributed sites without loss of local control of the data, ensuring an institution’s ability to maintain proper custody of its datasets and protecting patient privacy and any institutional intellectual property that may result.

 

As more institutions join precision medicine platforms like the Collaborative Cancer Cloud, they will break trail on many important elements of collaborating in a federated environment. The Collaborative Cancer Cloud is designed to allow researchers to determine how and when their data will be used. For example, while the Collaborative Cancer Cloud does provide a standard set of tools, it is the institutions who determine what tools they will use and what tools can be used on their data. This type of personalized medicine platform is designed to evolve and adapt to meet the needs of the institutions using it, and not having the institutions conform to the tools they are using.

 

With the announcement today of OICR and DFCI helping Intel and OHSU to prove out and scale out these tools, it feels like the All in One Day is one step closer. But we have many miles to go to drive the kind of security, the kind of scale, the kind of collaborative data sharing that will be needed to accelerate the research, and thus the clinical options, for not only people with cancer but a wide range of diseases. We look forward to bringing on more collaborators, more data, and more tools-makers in the near future.

 

Learn more about Intel Life Sciences www.intel.com/healthcare/lifesciences

 

Interoperability should mean less cost for healthcare organizations and better data analysis for patients. Here are a few additional thoughts.

Each year millions of people all over the world, including more than 1 million patients in the United States, learn that they have a cancer diagnosis. Instead of going through painful chemotherapy that can kill healthy cells along with cancerous cells, what would happen if those patients were able to be treated as individuals based on their specific genome sequencing, and a precision treatment plan could be tailored specifically for their disease? And what if it could happen within 24 hours?

 

Today, I announced at the Intel Developer Forum that we are setting our sights on making this scenario a reality through an ambitious, open Platform-as-a-Service solution called the Collaborative Cancer Cloud.

 

The Collaborative Cancer Cloud is a precision medicine analytics platform that allows institutions to securely share patient genomic, imaging and clinical data for potentially lifesaving discoveries. It will enable large amounts of data from sites all around the world to be analyzed in a distributed way, while preserving the privacy and security of that patient data at each site.

 

The end goal is to empower researchers and doctors to help patients receive a diagnosis based on their genome and potentially arm clinicians with the data needed for a targeted treatment plan. By 2020, we envision this happening in 24 hours -- All in One Day. The focus is to help cancer centers worldwide—and eventually centers for other diseases—securely share their private clinical and research data with one another to generate larger datasets to benefit research and inform the specific treatment of their individual patients.

 

The Rise of Precision Medicine                        

Precision medicine – taking into account individual differences in people’s genes, environments, and lifestyles – is one of the biggest of the big data problems and is on the cusp of a remarkable transformation in medicine. We view genomics as the first wave of precision medicine, and we’re working with our partners to drive adoption of genomic sequencers, genomic appliances, and cloud-based genomic analytics. With the Collaborative Cancer Cloud, we are combining next generation Intel technologies and bio-science advancements to enable solutions that make it easier, faster, and more affordable for developers, researchers, and clinicians to understand any disease that has a genetic component, starting with Cancer.

 

Initially, Intel and the Knight Cancer Institute at Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU) will launch the Collaborative Cancer Cloud. We expect two new institutions will be on board by 2016, addressing the critical need for larger patient pools and practitioner awareness. And from there, we can open up this federated, secure Collaborative Cancer Cloud network to dozens of others institutions—or let them create their own--to accelerate the science and the precision treatment options for clinicians to share with their patients. They can also apply it to advance personalized research in other diseases that are known to have a genetic component, including Alzheimer’s, diabetes, autism, and more.

 

In the same timeframe, we also intend to deliver open source code contributions to ensure the broadest developer base possible is working on delivering interoperable solutions. Open sourcing this code will drive both interoperability across different clouds, and allow analytics across a broader set of data – resulting in better insights for personalized care.

 

A Complementary Effort

You may be asking, “Haven’t we seen efforts like this before?” There have been numerous multi-institution partnerships formed to utilize big data analytics to look for insights about cancer and its treatment. Our focus on the federation/distribution of private datasets is complementary to the exciting work that’s happening to make public data sets more accessible to research. In CCC, each partner will maintain control of its patients’ data, while the shareable cancer treatment knowledgebase grows in availability and in impact. We want to help harness the power of that data — in a way that benefits clinicians, researchers and patients with a better knowledgebase and preserves security and privacy. By securely sharing clinical and research data amongst many institutions while maintaining patient privacy, the entire research community can benefit from insights revealed in large data cohorts.

 

In the end, precision medicine will only be as precise as available data allows. To better understand complex diseases like cancer, the medical and technology industries must collaborate to make the growing wealth of insights resulting from secure analysis of public and private genetic datasets accessible for the patient’s benefit. And if we do, we can turn an agonizing and uncertain process for the patient into a personalized process that occurs all in one day.

 

We encourage you to view the links below to learn more about our work with OHSU:

OHSU’s Exacloud

Collaborative Analytics for Personalized Cancer Care

 

Learn more about precision medicine and genomic code research at these resources:

www.intel.com/healthcare/optimizecode

https://www.whitehouse.gov/precision-medicine

 

Now that organizations have the computing power to gather meaningful information on patients and understand the trends that can lead to better outcomes, what are their plans for population health management and what are the next steps?


Watch the clip above and let me know what you think. What are you doing to prepare for population health management?

 

Patient engagement and analytics were trending topics at HIMSS15. I now wonder how the essence of those conversations will change going forward.


In this video, I share insight into how the discussions around analytics and patient engagement need to shift toward improving the quality of care and reducing costs. I also look at how the growing volume of personal health data coming from wearables and genomic research will help drive truly customized care into becoming a reality.

 

Watch the short video and let us know what questions you have about the future of analytics and customized care, and where you think they’re headed.

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