Currently Being Moderated

With the release of the 2013 InformationWeek 500 list, InformationWeek recognized some of the nation’s most innovative users of business technology. The theme for this year’s award is digital business. According to InformationWeek Editor in Chief Rob Preston, “It’s a movement, rooted in data analytics, mobile computing, social networking and other customer-focused technologies that are turning companies and industries on their ear”.

 

Intel is continually learning and adapting from our own digital transformation journey. For example, when we first implemented a Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) program, we discovered a diversity of devices and applications that employees used in their personal lives that made them more productive. We then spent a lot of engineering time to be able to support a broad list of devices and capabilities so that employees could use devices that would make them more productive in their professional lives.

 

We also foster and encourage direct feedback from our employees to understand their usage and interaction with technology. This has taught us not to stay married to a solution if it doesn’t work in real world usage. This feedback mechanism forms a critical part of our user-centered approach to delivering IT services. Our philosophy is not about looking at what’s easiest to implement but what makes employees more productive and provides greater user satisfaction. After all, no one wants to provide technology that users find frustrating.

 

You can find out more about this approach from our white paper on Best Practices in User-Centered IT to learn why Intel was ranked 40th on the InformationWeek list.

 

What are some lessons that your organization has learned in its digital business journey?

Comments

Filter Blog

By author:
By date:
By tag: